Atypical Playlist

Post Election Playlist
November 16, 2016 1:43 pm

 

It’s been exactly one week since the outcome of one of the craziest elections America has ever witnessed.

The beasts have lovingly curated this playlist to help get us through all of the intense emotions – from shock and disbelief to sadness and anger – we’re going through.

Though we live in troubled times, we are all in this together. Let this playlist help us to remember not only that, but that we should never stop fighting hate with love.

P.S. Trump. Look behind you. We’re not going anywhere.

donald trump bernie sanders

MOVE WITH THE SEASON: FALL PLAYLIST
September 19, 2016 10:08 am

Oh  Fall, some love you, some hate you. The days grow colder and the sun sets earlier as a subtle reminder that WINTER IS COMING. This pumpkin flavored playlist (because what honestly isn’t pumpkin flavored right now) has got all the ups and downs of Fall feels.

Some slow songs to ease you into the dark cold (Morrissey), some upbeat songs to keep you moving with the seasons and doses of nostalgia (oh yeah, Hot Chip cover of Bruce’s Dancing In The Dark).

This playlist has everything including lots of awesome bands with shows coming up in New York you don’t want to miss. There are songs to get stoned to, songs to dance to, songs to mope to, songs to leave the basic bitch uggs and pumpkin spice everything behind for some stranger things…something atypical.

“When the time comes move with the season, lend your young ear to the sound of day.” –TEMPLES

 

ARTIST OF THE MONTH: AVI JACOB IS THE PERFECT MODEST MAN
September 1, 2016 12:05 am

Summer’s over people. Get those lively synth tunes about not letting the night escape us out of my face. The season of hibernation is upon us, and to help us soundtrack the cyclical death of all leaves is Avi Jacob. Be appreciative.

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Jacob’s latest single, “Pickup Truck, is an Americana wet dream from beginning to end. You’ve got a sweet acoustic guitar being masterfully plucked throughout, pickup trucks, lyrics alluding to a father being disappointed in his son. These are the pillars of our great country, and Jacob builds a beautiful house of music with them as his supporting base. This is the environment Jacob is most comfortable with.

Just watch the video of him performing “Modest Man below. It’s just him wailing on his guitar in the woods as he sings his heart out. There probably isn’t another person around for miles. What’s truly great about the video is how authentically homemade it is. No hi-def camera showing close up shots of him from all different angles, no detailed cinematography of the surrounding elements either. It’s simply a camera on a tripod set up on the back porch filming Avi Jacob perform. That’s it.

The idea of a truly genuine artist feels somewhat out of place in 2016. Every persona, as well as every song, tends to get workshopped ad nauseum. The true persona is there at the core, but everything built around him or her are half-truths and hyperbole. It obviously makes for great entertainment, but it’s always bittersweet realizing that the person making such human and relatable art isn’t actually relatable (or even that human) in real life whatsoever. However, every line that Jacob powers out of his soul affirms that what’s being said is 100% him.

Because of this, Avi Jacob doesn’t have the wildest of web presences. He has a total of 79 tweets. His Facebook is only used to promote his performances. And from what it looks like, his website doesn’t even work. It’s doubtful that any of this bothers him though. Because it genuinely seems as though he is an actual rogue folk music folk tale who jumps from town to town by trading a song for a bed and some hot supper.

Maybe it’s all just a ruse and he’s secretly been a millionaire method actor researching for his next role this whole time. Inside Llewyn Davis desperately needs a sequel, so it would make sense. Other than that scenario, Avi Jacob is most likely the real deal that Folk music needs right now. His voice is passionate and his songs are beautifully heartbreaking. What you see is wholeheartedly what you get.

ARTIST OF THE MONTH: GRACE JOYNER, CHARLESTON’S WOOZY FOLK SONGSTRESS
August 5, 2016 12:45 pm

Grace Joyner, the Ashville-via-Charleston electronic-folk songstress is our August Artist of the Month. Hers is a story of reckless abandon, picking yourself up when you’re down, and chasing the dream to the end of the earth (which so far is a distance that spans from the Carolina coast to the outskirts of Kentucky). Nonetheless, Joyner’s voyage wouldn’t have even been possible if it weren’t for the pack of boundlessly collaborative strays known as Hearts & Plugs.  We’re going to talk about them too, but first, let me lure you in with a little bit of old fashioned dialogue:

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 “Yoooo, Joe!”
“Oh, what’s up Zimmerman?”
“So…you know Johnnie?”
“Yeah man, me and Johnnie are real tight.”
“Dude, you should come out this Friday”
“Word, yeah”
“Let me text Dan”
“Dan?”
“Yeah, you know, Jenkin’s friend”
“Oh, he’s friends with Jordan too I think”

If you’re an aspiring musician you’ve been part of that ‘crew’ before. You know exactly what I’m talking about.  That group of friends that think they’re going to start a band, travel across the country in a minivan, and upend our entire social infrastructure. Maybe you meet in a basement, or perhaps a front porch.  There’s no formal membership, no secret handshake. While you’re far from new age cult status, certain vestiges of hippy culture might seep in occasionally. Countless students have formed similar cadres. Why? Because they want to live in the moment. Be a part of the bonfire jam sessions that catapult musical revolutions. Discover new forms of sonic expression and collectively explore the universe together to make sense of its stellar enormity.

The thing is, occasionally, one of these slacker collectives actually sees it through to the other side. Occasionally, hipsters mobilize. Word spreads and they start to pick up steam. They score gigs, sell out local venues, generate revenue, invest in better equipment, chip in for a recording studio, and before you know it, are a permanent fixture in the local music landscape.

Hearts & Plugs is one of these collectives.  Based in sun-scorched Charleston, South Carolina, Hearts & Plugs is a burgeoning music label built around an intimate nexus of friends that were probably jamming on someone’s porch not too long ago.  They’ve since amassed a steady following thanks to a robust roster of folk-centric indie pop acts oozing with creative juices.

Front and center of the operation is founder and director Dan McCurry. He brings with him a breadth of business savvy accumulated from past business experiences; both the ups and the downs. The label started out of necessity when his own band, Run Dan Run, needed a new home to record their sophomore album.  As such, they recorded Normal in 2011, Hearts & Plugs first official release. Hearts & Plugs’ in-house recording studio is operated by Wolfgang Zimmerman, who also plays the drums for Brave Baby. The sleek psych-pop outlet is also one of the label’s rising stars, having garnered critical praise for their sophomore release Electric Friends—think Arcade Fire in scope, sonically akin to Tame Impala, with a rugged southern twang. Other noteworthy members include alt-country rockers SUSTO, and doo-wop post-punkers Gold Light, and many more. Almost every act on the Hearts & Plugs team is a collaborative affair of interspersing band members.  At some point while contributing backing harmonies, Grace Joyner joined the mix.

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It didn’t take long for Grace Joyner’s woozy yet robust vocal palate to get noticed.  Her first solo recording came in the form of Young Fools—fleeting and vulnerable songs culled from emotional pangs of successes, failures, trials, tribulations, ambition, and regret.  Exemplified by tracks such as “Be Good” and “Young Thing”, the EP effectively captures Joyner’s essence, drawing comparisons to other strong female voices such as Kate Bush and Lana Del Rey.

Two years of relentless gigging and creative musing, Joyner was ready to record her debut full-length album.  Maybe Sometimes in C is a vibrantly colored folk symphony that showcases both Grace’s impressive vocals coated in an immersive synth backdrop.  Maybe Sometimes in C allowed Grace further opportunities to hit the road and expand her reach, recently touring through the Carolinas and Kentucky with Gold Light in support of their album Visions.

I got the chance to ask Grace Joyner a few questions about her recent creative pursuits, about living in Charleston and collaborating with Hearts & Plugs, and what’s next on the docket.  Check it out:

Q: You’re a Charleston gal, a city which–although certainly known for being a great travel destination—it’s also a city with a jam-packed music scene, does Charleston feel underrated to you at all?

A: The Charleston music scene has been rapidly growing in the last couple years thanks to Dan and Hearts & Plugs, along with some amazing venues, such as The Royal American. Throughout that growing process, I believe it has been getting the recognition it deserves. There are a lot of amazing musicians there, and we have all been working together to get Charleston on the map for music. I really think it is starting to get there.

Q: Speaking of, it would be hard to find a group of musicians more passionate about and gunning harder for a music scene than Hearts and Plugs.  How’s it been working with them?

A: It has been truly inspiring to see Hearts & plugs develop into what it is now. It is such an example of what a good idea can become if you combine it with hard work. Dan is an amazing visionary and I am very thankful to be a part of what him & Megan are doing.

Q: I’m try to pin down the Charleston music vibe—there are lots of artists, lots of musicians, so it’s impossible to boil it down completely—but what’s separating Charleston from another large music scene in the vicinity, like say, Asheville or Carrboro?  

A: Something about the Charleston music scene that I think is very special is the sense of community. We really are a family. We all collaborate all the time and are constantly supporting one another. Some of us have known each other for nearly a decade. We have maintained such a comfortable creative space, and I think that is what sets us apart.

Q: Speaking of Asheville, you were recently on the road with you were recently on the road with Gold Light, they seem like a fun crowd—and it looks like you hit up some cool places—how was that tour overall?

A: The tour was magical. Joe, from Gold Light, contacted me a couple months ago with the idea of collaborating and doing a short run together. I don’t think either of us were expecting it to go so smoothly and seem so natural. The band we had with us were such a great group of people and at almost every spot we hit we had these serendipitous moments. Everything fell into place on that tour, and we are about to start working on another one with the same group. Hopefully the details will be worked out in the next couple weeks.

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Q: I didn’t realize the album cover for Maybe Something in C was a cropped photo of you in a bathtub filled with some kind of dark blue liquid–what was the story behind that photo?  Who took it?

A: So that was an idea I had, and we just kind of went with it to be honest. My roommate Keex took the photo in my bathroom. We used a blue bath bomb to get the coloring. I just thought the image was interesting. My bathroom has this mundane vibe to it, and I thought adding a romantic contrast would turn out well.

Q: So is Maybe Sometimes in C, actually in the key of C?  Or are you riffing off of a completely different reference and I’m just completely missing it?

A: No you are pretty much on point. There was a running joke with my producer, Wolfgang Zimmerman, about how often songs are in C. It is easy for me to write in that key, so he was always teasing me about changing it up. Of course they are not all in C, but it is a reference to that. Also there is a line in the first track, “I’m not crazy, or maybe sometimes…” It has to do with recognizing value even when there are faults.

Q: I saw an Instagram pic of Hug O’ War, were you a big Shel Silverstein fan growing up?  Has his poetry snuck itself into your lyrics at all?

A: I LOVE Shel Silverstein. Hmm…that is a good question though. I think I resonate with a lot of themes he plays around with, but I can’t pinpoint any direct lyric references. My favorite poem of his is “The Perfect High.”

Q: There’s another pic of The Velvet Underground performed by ET Anderson & Grace Joyner?  Seriously?  That’s the coolest thing ever!  

A: That was an awesome night. ET Anderson let me join in for a Velvet Underground cover set for an event as Nico. I was honored. It was so fun.

Q: I saw you also posted a Tina meme, are you a big fan of Bob’s burgers?  Is there a particular burger joint in Charleston we should be aware of?

A: Wow I am so impressed. You have done so much research. I am a fan of Bob’s Burgers, but to be honest I don’t eat a lot of burgers… I will say Moe’s Crosstown has amazing brunch & I hear they have great burgers so that is what I am going to go with for this question.

Q: I’m a North Carolina guy myself–I was glad to see your allegiance to the Carolina Panthers, did you enjoy watching them kick ass last year?  Are you excited for the season to kick off again?

A: My family is from North Carolina so I grew up a fan of the Panthers. Watching them kick ass last season was so fun. Cam is such a babe. I am sure we will kill it this season.

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Q: Last one—this is all you—what’s up next for Grace Joyner?  Any new projects on the horizon?  Cool collaborations?  Hitting up the recording studio anytime soon?  When’s your next show?  When are people not from below the Mason Dixon line going to see Grace Joyner live?

A: We have a little run in Columbia & Charleston the weekend of 8.19-8.20. Then we have some other Carolina shows coming up in the next couple months. Currently about to start planning another tour with Gold Light for the Fall & we are working on extending our reach! I haven’t had a whole lot of writing inspiration until recently. So many ideas are rolling around in my head & I am just about ready to start working through them. I expect a good amount of new songs on the horizon, and soon after that it will be in the works to get them out.

Hearts & Plugs is an excellent source of fresh musical discovery, and even though I’ve listened through more than a handful of their artists this week, I feel like I’m just scratching the surface.  They’ve put a lot of work into honing their craft. More importantly though, their label is a guiding light post for the bold, the artistically curious, poetically odd, and all around atypical.  We’re eager for more!

Until next time, check out the label’s awesome spread of merch as well as their Summer Essentials playlist, below!

ODE TO THE END OF SUMMER
August 1, 2016 5:21 pm

All good things must come to an end as all people know. Be it the final climax of your favorite summer movie, the ultimate ladling of icy green summer gazpacho, or even the sunset on the last day of your final real summer vacation, time has a cruel habit of overstaying its welcome and continuing to exist well beyond our capacity to enjoy it.

Truly, we must savor these dwindling summer days. There is only ever today, always and forever, presented as future but turned present upon confrontation and then past as it disappears into memory. Hauntingly beautiful, terrifyingly predictable, waveringly consistent; the end of summer has been staring us down since the end of spring. Despite my best effort to avoid eye-contact, it is time to acknowledge its mystery and gear up for September.

So with that in mind, we’ve assembled a few songs you might enjoy to help get you there. Don’t think of it as goodbye summer but as hello autumn. It is the most thoughtful of seasons, chilly and colorful, waiting in the wings, eager to take its place as the metaphysical envelope in which we live our daily lives.

COLONY HOUSE; YOUR NEW HOME FOR ROCK
July 5, 2016 12:36 pm

When we think of Rock N’ Roll, a slew of different artists and styles enter our minds. We imagine The Beatles rocking out with thousands of screaming fans and Iron Maiden storming the stage with face melting guitar solos, or Queen’s poetic, slightly softer rock and Green Day’s heavy punk attitude. Rock encompasses a lot, but the band Colony House describes themselves as “rock n’ roll” with “stripped down instruments,” which couldn’t be more accurate.

Colony House was once a mad rock trio made up of Caleb Chapman (vocals/guitar), Will Chapman (drums) and Scott Mills (guitar), but recently added a fourth, Parke Cottrell (bass), creating an epic rock quartet. All four of these guys came from Franklin, Tennessee. The band name comes from a humble apartment complex in Franklin that all the band members have grown to call home in one way or another.

Colony House has that perfect simplicity and creativity that the world needs and you can hear it in their new single “You Know It.” Their music is fast, full of energy and purity. I love the straightforward formula, great chords on the guitar, varied drums and strong vocals, an easy hit for the summer. They are coming out with their second full album Only the Lonely on September 16th, so although we’ll have to wait a bit, it will be worth it.

If you can’t wait till then for the pure Tennessee rock of Colony House, check out their last album and EPs here. Roll down the windows, drive fast and blast “You Know It” for the whole summer. I know I will.

The Dumbest Beatles Songs Ever
May 27, 2016 1:56 pm

While creating a catalog that’s stood the test of time and is universally adored by basically everyone, it’s amusing to see just how many stupid songs The Beatles were able to get away with. I love all of them, even the ones I say are terrible, but wow, there are simply alarmingly high levels of goofiness on a lot of their songs, especially in their later, more critically adored work.

All while bands of that era delved into psychedelic strangeness, obviously, but it would usually lead to more heaviness. For The Beatles, they always found the childlike wonderment in it, and could turn such a minimal idea into a song with so much room for interpretation. It’s a great testament to their dedication to production and their natural gifts as songwriters, because they seriously turned some of the dumbest ideas into timeless songs that would have been a completely forgotten about one-off novelty hit in less capable hands.

Bless these very dumb geniuses.

Mean Mr. Mustard

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x36m24b_mean-mr-mustard_shortfilms

Unsurprisingly, quite a few Abbey Road songs made this list. It’s incredible how detestable Mean Mr. Mustard the person is after just hearing about him within the confines of a 1 minute song. This guy comes off like a possible Roald Dahl character. My heart goes out to his sister Pam, who John Lennon then says looks like a man in the very next song like a real putzface. Who’s he to make that sort of comment about such a doting sister taking her dirtbag brother to see the Queen all the time? For shame.

Rocky Raccoon

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sif7Br-K1mI

This is basically a Bob Dylan parody. It’s not as good as Weird Al’s, but it was fine for the time. And there are a lot of really spot-on Dylan elements here: a bare boned acoustic guitar, intimate, non layered, vocals and more stupid harmonica than you could ever ask for.

Being For The Benefit Of Mr. Kite

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-CMOMYdIlI

John was feeling a little lazy during the recording process of Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band. That’s not often talked about because the best moments from the album were heavily John related, but it happened. My favorite example of this has to be the fact that basically every word from Mr. Kite was taken off a vintage circus poster. On one hand, it speaks to Lennon’s genius as a songwriter that he can eke a psychedelic pop gem out of such an arbitrary piece of inspiration. On the other, my heart truly goes out to Paul for having to hear what must have been the most half baked and aloof pitch for a song ever.

I Am The Walrus

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lM5VF5U1DBE

Anything off Magical Mystery Tour should just be accepted as silly for the sake of silly. A lot of weirdness happens on that album. But ‘I Am The Walrus’ is a special case, considering how its meaninglessly weird lyrics were inspired by the desire to spite a high school teacher who wrote to John Lennon to tell him that he taught a class that analyzed Beatles songs.

Part of me hopes that Lennon spent the rest of his life jabbing this teacher throughout the years. Like, every month or so, this working class teacher would get a letter in the mail from John Lennon, the most famous person in the world, and it would be is a booger smeared on a blank sheet of paper with the message ‘analyze this, dickhole’ written at the bottom. I’m being too mean to John Lennon right now. I’m sorry, Ghost Lennon. Let’s make fun of Ringo.

Octopus’s Garden

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArkKbQG1_Mw

I’m limiting this list to one Ringo song because I am a merciful human being. The thing is, most of these dumb Beatles songs are able to toe the line pretty well. The lyrical content might lean towards being a goofy kids song, but the production choices are usually stellar enough for it to be a compelling listen. With Ringo at the helm, they go full Wiggles with the corniness. The guitar tuning is so so cheesy. I hate it. There’s even that stupid little guitar plucking finale that’s usually reserved for fucking hee-haw. Ugh. The worst.

And Your Bird Can Sing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IHtYGzzbfg

The way ‘And Your Bird Can Sing’ is used here makes it seem as though John thinks it’s an already well known idiom or he’s trying to turn it into one. My mom does this all the time. Whenever I’m looking for something that winds up being in a place right in front of my face, she gleefully chants “water at the beach”. Because, you know, when you go to the beach, finding water is pretty easy. Hyuck hyuck. Well, that’s basically how I feel every time I hear this song. Just a failed attempt at trying to create a cool expression.

Maxwell’s Silver Hammer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c93n53XSf2A

The cheeriest ditty you’ll ever hear about a out of control murderer. Maxwell kills a lot of people. It’s this cute, charming little character quirk of his. The most disturbing/my favorite part of this song is the little chuckle Paul McCartney has when saying the word ‘writing’ in the second verse about Maxwell’s teacher reprimanding him. Because he knows that Maxwell’s about to murder again. For Maxwell is Paul’s creation and Maxwell will do whatever is asked of him. Also, it seems as though both Paul and John have strained relationships with educators. Who knows what that’s about.

Helter Skelter

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eFJ8GqUyu4

Oh, and speaking of mass murderers… Look at all these connections I’m making! I mean, you’ve gotta get at least a few dumb points for inspiring one of the most psychotic minds of the last 50 years. Especially since the song is literally just Paul discussing what happens when he rides a roller coaster. Which says everything about the 8 year old boy essence of most Beatles songs. Their most hard rocking song ever is about a fun day at Six Flags.

BONUS

Piggies

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KGizYSCa-c

I’m just going to add ‘Piggies’ here at the end because watching this animated video of pigs shitting for 2 minutes and then a choir of pig shits singing at the end is mandatory viewing for everybody.

TRACK REVIEW: BRAND NEW’S ‘I AM A NIGHTMARE’
May 19, 2016 4:52 pm

Nobody knows when Brand New frontman Jesse Lacey is gonna decide to fully detach himself from society and retreat into the ozarks, where he’ll choose to only play his emo art rock in front of a small, yet loyal, horde of raccoons and squirrels with intricately designed sleeve tattoos. It could seriously happen at any time. That’s why fans couldn’t help but gush and obsess over last year’s emergence of “Mene and “Sealed To Me,” the band’s first sign of new music since their 2009 release, Daisy. Who cares if they were just leftover demos from 2006? These people will take anything they can get from Lacey at this point.

While Brand New’s been famous for toying with their obsessive fan base over the years, 2016 has seen the band as transparent as they’ve ever been. They’ll be co-headlining an honest-to-God tour with Modest Mouse this summer, then followed that news up by announcing plans for a new album via cryptic email. And now, we’ve got said album’s very first single, “I Am A Nightmare.”

As someone who eats up any and all of the intentional cryptic tomfoolery Brand New likes to pull off, I seriously cannot believe this is finally happening. I was content with another decade of one-off shows in Cooperstown, New York and mailing fans the strangest looking lyric books years after they ordered them. But now that this day is finally here, I’m speechless. Okay, I’ve gotta listen to this thing before writing one more word.

Pretty shitty, right? This is really disappointing. The opening riff to this sounds like it belongs on the loading screen of SSX Tricky and it follows the same bland formula abandoned by now obsolete bands that Brand New left in the dirt over a decade ago. What brought Brand New to this level of mysticism is how they transcended their original genre of basement Pop-Punk, turning their sound into something harsh and unforgiving held together by a kinda creepy/kinda dark emotional foundation.

There really isn’t much of that here.

It’s the laziest vocal effort Lacey’s given his entire career. Usually, if he’s even keel in a song, they’ll add a layer of him in a different note as a counterbalance. But on “Nightmare,” there isn’t a single howl or scream. It’s a consistently boring murmur.

This isn’t exactly the best foot a band would want to put forward after a 7 year hiatus. It doesn’t build off any of their past releases or show a different route being explored whatsoever. They’ve devolved the progress made by genre deviating works like The Devil And God Are Raging Inside Me and Daisy back to the mean of their contemporaries.

And so after nearly a decade, the most Brand New can muster for a comeback single is a banal pop ditty filled with saccharine guitars and a hook that any listener can see coming from a mile away. What a fucking nightmare.

DENUO: A BRIGHT BROODING
May 12, 2016 11:57 am

Denuo plays beautifully dark music in minor keys that floats a person down a river of reflection while not becoming grim or unpleasant.  

Tom Mason is the man behind this intriguing and powerful music. Born in North Wales, UK, Mason started up the band in 2007 and was joined by Sam Barnes and Harry Jones playing through various cities in the UK. Their first studio album Scarlet Sleep came out in 2014 and two years later they came out with a four song EP, Frozen Lake.

Now, to the important stuff, the actual music. I’ve been using a lot of heavy imagery to describe it because it is the best way to describe it. Denuo’s music is like a winding river through the night, strong, daunting and mysterious. There are the more upbeat songs like “Closer” or “Dreamless,” but most are like “Waves of Silver” and “Frozen Lake.” His clear cut parts which normally just consist of guitar, drums and bass with a small mix of synth pads make for something more intimate for the listener to connect to. The music is well written, but I am going to say that the bass lines are really good: simple and subtle but flow so well throughout the songs.

Frozen Lake was recorded over this past winter months allowing it to stay within their mellow, dark musical style while slowly serenading those bleak and beautiful winter nights. The songs pull you into the winter ice with graceful sounds and creative writing.

Their music isn’t something I’d have on a loop all day, but today has been particularly rainy and gray outside (in DC) and it fits in a satisfactory way. So go ahead open your mind with these songs and listen for the power and wonder that comes from Denuo.

A GOLD NUGGET AMONG THE FLAKES: IDGY DEAN
May 5, 2016 12:34 pm

In the California Gold Rush, people would spend hours picking up small specks of gold in filtering systems along a stream or river. Idgy Dean is like finding a huge mass of gold tumbling down the hill into your lap. In other words, if you are able to filter through the endless hours of mediocre pop and rock artists and stumble upon her, you’re incredibly lucky, because she is pure gold.

Why do I say this? Besides the fact that she is our May Artist of the Month, just watch the video of her playing and you’ll see instantly this untampered, untainted unique woman at work making more creative music than you’ve heard all day. Listen to songs like “Bang Bang Sun” or “Inauguration” to see her wide variety of talents. But first watch her latest release, “Pantheon punk” below!

Lindsay Sanwald is the enigma behind the inde-mind-bending-experience that is Idgy Dean. Sanwald writes and plays all of her music. She made the song “The Indian Squirrel Dance” in her room with Garage Band. Her ability to write, play and perform music is jaw-dropping.

We’ll start with her actual writing capability. The power to summon masterfully crafted pieces that have such balance of highs and lows is basically inexplicable. Her songs as stand alone pieces are great, but to me, they have this presence that paints a vivid and colorful story in my mind. Artists who specialize in soundtracks like Hans Zimmer (Inception and The Dark Knight Trilogy) and Danny Elfman (Spider Man and Psycho) have this ability to create ambience, personality and tone in a matter of seconds of their music, and Idgy is no different. Listening to her songs again and again, a person will just fall deeper, continuously discovering new components of her music each time. 

Next, let’s hit the amazing knack Lindsay has of keeping track of all parts of a song and various vocal parts while playing it live. If you get the chance to see her live, DO IT. She’ll be playing in New York on May 19th, presented by yours truly, ATYPICAL SOUNDS, and I highly encourage you to catch that show. Watching her play drums, looping them and then picking up the guitar and singing while changing loops is like seeing a painting come to life in front of you. Her grasp of simple and energetic drums is astounding and being able to create guitar parts that repeat and yet never overstay their welcome is fascinating to watch. Her voice is sublime and soothing, a call straight from the soul that reaches further and deeper than the listeners ears.

Lindsey sticks to her style, aware of what she wants and as she said in an interview with GBP, “Idgy Dean is the highest pursuit of my highest self—it’s my raw core cultivated. The more adventurous, present, and honest I am, the better it seems to work.” This honest and raw version of herself is heard through her music perfectly. She has this intense potential to create worlds with her music and I look forward to many albums of her majestic music.

To end this I’ll say one last thing, gold is very precious, it is rare, beautiful and has no real equal, and this is why Idgy Dean is pure gold.