LAST TASTE OF FAILE @ BK MUSEUM

Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller are the master collaborators who morphed together two greatly artistic minds to conceptualize Faile. Sections of the “Savage/Sacred Young Minds” exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum has been splattered all over the Instagrams of Brooklynites since July, and it only resides here until October 4th, so tap into that nostalgia of the graffiti covered walls you saw inside the tiny bathroom of your first Brooklyn pub, and delve into the energy of the artwork inspired by such a staple of NYC grit.

I walked into the drastic blast of glowing colors and neon lights that covered the entirety of the 5th floor Faile exhibit. Now, I gotta be honest, it was the last hour the museum was open and I had prepared myself for a truly ethereal, artful immersion for Faile at a bottomless brunch earlier, so it took my eyes a second to adjust. Once that happened, I was able to witness the awe of this installation. I felt silly for waiting this long to see it in the first place since I had a craving the next day to be inside the room once again. It gave me nostalgic fondness of adolescent innocence; trying to make sense of and understand the world through a perspective of pop culture, digital interactions, and a rebellion whose loudness reverberated off the walls.

FAILE ART

The interactivity displayed through pinball machines in the arcade were a perfect provider of the playful noise that encapsulated the down-to-earth, full sensory experience that the Patricks intended to create. It was not just an amazingly modern Warhol-esque exhibit, it was a full-bodied experience that was too small for my liking. The entire damn 5th floor could have been turned into a little galaxy of trippy colors and could have moved the American Identities to the fabric of the streets of Brooklyn itself! (Kidding.. American Identities is great too! Although it would be cool to see them plastered on brick buildings.)

Public accessibility to great art adds to the likability of the Patricks, whose namesake “Faile” came from “A Life” because of their interest to incorporate what every good artist knows all too well. “Look past your failures and you’ll find life.”

Written by Annie Paul 

FAILE ART

@dustyrebel FaileArt In Redhook, BK

@dustyrebel FaileArt In Redhook, BK

FAILE ART

FAILE ART

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