iOs

iOS 10: THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE USELESS
October 4, 2016 5:52 pm

The craze of the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus a few weeks ago and the flood of memes about it having no headphone jack is basically all everyone was talking about in September. Surprisingly though, iOS 10 seems to be where the actual rich changes are in Apple’s products. iOS 10 is good, a nice upgrade for those who are obsessed with more flash and less function. There is a huge amount updated, and I won’t go through all  of it, but here are my impressions of having it so far.

THE GOOD:

It is fun. It is entertaining. Siri is smarter and opens programs for you or just does what you ask with certain apps, like finding you directions to the closest gas station. The iMessanger has been greatly overhauled, almost too much for my blood. Maybe it is my age, but I don’t need ALL these features. You can draw with cool effects, send messages that slam into the conversation and search all sorts of gifs to send friends. Don’t get me wrong, I love all these things, but it getting to be too much. Like how often am I going to honestly send a neon drawn picture with kissy lips appearing all over it? The change in shape and design of alert banners seemed odd and unnecessary at first, but I’ve gotten used to them, they just hover for too long in my opinion. One of the best, and my favorite, things is that I can finally delete a lot of iPhone permanent apps that weren’t previously aloud to be deleted, so I am very happy about that. Also the quick menu that you get from the bottom is a little weird, but not terrible, the fact that you can swipe to media that is being played and change it there is pretty cool, but still slightly cumbersome.

 

THE BAD:

It is getting messy. I had to download ANOTHER app called Home which I automatically put into my group of dumb apps that I don’t need and just take up space. The messenger keyboard will sometimes get stuck sideways making me have to restart the app just to fix it so I can type. When I double click the home button, the app will shift sideways and I can’t select, scroll or close them, and so I have to lock my phone and unlock it to  get it to function correctly again.

 

THE USELESS:

Like I was saying in the “Good” section, the messenger is getting too cluttered, and has too much different functions that I am never going to use on a daily basis. The forced install app Home, which connects itself to you home system of light, TV or other electronics), seems cool, but if you don’t have everything already set up and have Apps or remotes for those things, you won’t ever need it. I guess it can be helpful because who really wants to get up to turn off lights with a light switch anymore? That was so last millennium (heavy sarcasm).  The new left swipe list of new and alerts looks unorganized and pointless to have, just like before, but now it is slightly different and I have no desire to learn how to use it effectively.

 

All in all getting the update isn’t that bad, it just has so much hullabaloo and so many bugs that it is kind of annoying. It is fun for sure, it really is, but it feels like a stupid app you download for fun because your friends did, but unfortunately it is permanently here and essential to the future function of you Apple device. I hope for some good updates and cleaning of iOS 10, because it does have the potential to be something great.

BEME APP TAKES FRESH APPROACH TO SHARING ONLINE
May 25, 2016 1:01 pm

Most people use at least one form of social media, be it Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or some other platform. Many of us are active on multiple networks. Simply put, the internet has changed the way we interact with others. A byproduct of this interconnectivity is the attention to our online presence. With editing and selection, social media users can create an online identity that may, or may not, accurately represent who we are. 

Bemebemeconcept, a video-sharing application launched as a beta version in July of 2015, is re-envisioning the nature of social media. When sharing on Beme there is no way to edit what you are posting. You don’t even have to look at your phone. 

Created by vlogging icon Casey Neistat and former Tumblr VP of Engineering Matt Hackett, Beme is an attempt to bring authenticity back into social media. In the words of Neistat, “[Beme] is a platform to share your perspectives, to share your world with video, and to see other people’s perspectives via video that you can trust, that’s real.”

Here’s how it works: Beme uses the proximity sensor on your phone’s camera to begin recording videos up to 8 seconds long. By covering your phone’s sensor, Beme records what you are actually seeing and then automatically posts it online.  There are no filters, no hashtags and no way to preview clips. To take a selfie, flip the phone around and repeat the process.

You can also record by tapping and holding a camera icon within the app, but the video recording screen remains black until the clip is posted. This helps to counteract issues when recording with devices without a proximity sensor, or if covering the sensor makes it difficult to capture what you want to record, while maintaining Beme’s unfiltered nature.

Beme users can fill up their personal Beme profiles with clips for people to view and share reactions to other people’s videos. The result is a unique, unaltered insight into the way that people experience the world. When other users view your Beme videos the app even notifies you that, “1 person has spent [insert seconds] as you.” 

Beme has a lot of the same flavor as Casey Neistat’s daily Vlog. The videos of his life make a point to maintain an honest relationship with his audience. Although edited in Final Cut Pro X, all of Neistat’s YouTube videos have a raw and unscripted feel, the same sensation you get when using Beme. 

The app’s interface is intuitive, but may be challenging if using Beme is your first foray into social media. Other than a short introductory video and walkthrough after launching the application, Beme doesn’t give you much direction for navigating the app or posting your videos. That said, figuring out Beme’s nuances can be accomplished by tinkering with the app for a few minutes.

After encountering some issues following the initial launch, the Beme team went back to the drawing board and produced a product that is a fresh and innovative approach to social media. Now out of the beta-version, Beme is on full-release for iOS and Android platforms, and can be downloaded in the App Store and Google Play.

Enjoyable Casey Neistat vlog: breaking up is hard to do 

Record On The Go With Track’d
September 30, 2015 3:24 pm

We here at ATYPICALSOUNDS know musicians. Most of us are musicians. We’ve all been there; sitting in your buddy’s (insert- garage, bedroom, fire escape, etc) and just free-styling music; strumming your grandpa’s acoustic while scribbling poetic lyrics about that asshole..I mean… the one that got away. Well, now you can capture these impromptu moments of musical glory.

Trackd is an iOS App that is a simple and easy-to-use tool for artists to record, view, listen, share, and collaborate with other musicians around the world (or just the ones you played in your high school band with).  Trackd creates a simple platform with the basic recording tools musicians need and combines it with the ability to collaborate on those recordings with others. It provides an easy way to capture inspiration on the go with the ability to find and work with other musicians.  Since all of this can be done through your phone, it can be done almost anywhere, anytime.

It can be difficult to find artists who share similar musical styles and ideas, especially if you live in an area that lacks a substantial music scene (#BrooklynAllDay). This app aims to solve those problems and has a credible team of musicians, creatives, and technologists behind it. The Trackd team is made up of Russel Sheffield, James Easton, Daniel James Diggle, and Aaron Ray. Sheffield’s father is a founder of Trident Studios in the UK where acts such as the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Lou Reed, and David Bowie have recorded some of their biggest hits. Diggle is a freelance designer, illustrator, and animator who has worked for some fairly large clients. You might’ve heard of them in passing…Google and Coca-Cola? No? Nevermind, then. Ray is a successful NYC-based app developer.

Trackd

So why am I giving you this much information on them and not the app itself?  Unlike a lot of other apps Trackd is clearly a creation by people who know what they are doing.  

As for myself, I have minimal experience recording music, although I’ve done my fair share dabbling in Garageband few times. As an amateur, I was so surprised at how extremely easy Trackd was to use.  There is a short tutorial video in the beginning that guides you through the basics. It was so easy to record, delete, edit, discover other artists, collaborate, and share music.  There are mixing tools that easily allow you to adjust volume levels while your track is playing and it even has pan controls.

Released in August, it already had 18,000 users after only two weeks of being active and feedback has been very positive

The app is still new so there are limits to its capabilities but on Trackd’s Facebook they promise cool updates and expansions are on the way. For $1.99 you can upgrade the app to allow 8 tracks instead of 4 but besides that everything is free! 

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