Muse

Post Election Playlist
November 16, 2016 1:43 pm

 

It’s been exactly one week since the outcome of one of the craziest elections America has ever witnessed.

The beasts have lovingly curated this playlist to help get us through all of the intense emotions – from shock and disbelief to sadness and anger – we’re going through.

Though we live in troubled times, we are all in this together. Let this playlist help us to remember not only that, but that we should never stop fighting hate with love.

P.S. Trump. Look behind you. We’re not going anywhere.

donald trump bernie sanders

WOLFMOTHER REIGNS VICTORIOUS
February 24, 2016 12:05 am

I have a playlist of songs that I’d listen to if I were ever on the front lines of a war. I’m pretty sure most of today’s soldiers blast music under their helmets, and I always wonder what I would want pumping through my ears in the heat of battle. What would push me to succeed? To fight harder or smarter or better. What if it was the last thing I ever heard?

So I made a war playlist, and Wolfmother was the first thing on it. Sprinkle in some MuseRATM, and the like and you got yourself something real, something awesome. I listen to it on the highway or while doing a particularly aggressive load of laundry. Every so often I add a song here and there, but not until Wolfmother’s new album, Victorious, did I consider adding all 10 songs from the album at once, but I seriously might.

Just check out the title track, a screaming headbanger, a triumphant, anthemic force of energy. Creative genius Andrew Stockdale (and whoever is playing around him these days) is back to the “rollicking, galloping beats and big riffs” that Wolfmother is known for. Many of these tracks could be your new favorite pump-up song. The notable exception is called Pretty Peggy, an acoustic ballad reminiscent of their previous “love-song,” Vagabond.

It’s as if Stockdale took all his most popular songs and rewrote them with different words and music, but the same look and feel. Like when you go to the west coast and realize their mayonnaise has a different name. Sure it feels a little off, but you still slather it around your sandwiches and whip it into your deviled eggs. New look, same great taste!

The most amazing thing about Wolfmother through the years is how they consistently sound like fifteen different bands all at once. Everyone from Black Sabbath to The White Stripes, Zeppelin to Jet, Kings Of Leon to Queens of the Stone Age. And somehow–despite numerous lineup changes and artistic bullshit–they maintain the same generic timelessness we’ve come to expect, even after a decade or so of aggressive, high-octane awesomeness. Impressive.

Wolfmother is currently on tour to support the album, stopping by NYC’s Webster Hall on March 4th. They’ll continue throughout the US and Canada until April 1st, play in Europe for 6 weeks, and then finish the tour in NJ at the end of May. See them before they go back down under!

GET WEIRD WITH THE CLAYPOOL LENNON DELIRIUM
January 28, 2016 2:53 am

If you’ve never heard Primus, or their singer Les Claypool’s bass lines, then you’re in luck.  Not only does “Cricket And The Genie” contain one of the better bass lines I’ve heard this year, but it also contains Sean Lennon as a part of the mega two-piece called The Claypool Lennon Delirium.

Lennon surely takes after his father in this collaboration, without a doubt.  The eight minute song starts out with a very eerie bass intro and a vocals that sound like the Beatles have returned.  The bass style is driven with such a delicious tone and complex structure through out the song that you get lost in it.  Lennon’s vocals have their own soft but playful taste to them, summoning his father’s ghost with a throat singing style, similar to Elliott Smith in his harsher elements of delivery.  The keys in this song form an interesting mix of melancholy and downright creepy, creating the stage for a Muselike overall darkness but with the DNA of two of the worlds greatest musicians.  The song obviously features a little bit of a cricket song as well.

This song throws you for a loop. There is a break down around the 3:55 minute mark, almost halfway through the song, that kind of blows my mind. In a Rolling Stone article Claypool stated about Lennon, “His DNA definitely shines through, though it isn’t just his father’s musical sensibilities that he reflects but also his mother’s abstract perspective, which to me, makes for a glorious freak stew.”

Freak stew is probably the best description i’ve heard so far.  Only its the right kind of freak stew, the kind you want to gorge on for weeks on end. For whatever reason the raw and not quite abrasive quality of the song drags you right in with the acquired taste that they sell and they sell it flawlessly.  I heard this song multiple times and I’ve had the swimming melodies and punchy driving bass lines ingrained in my mind for about a week.

Lennon states,

“The Claypool Lennon Delirium will (gently) melt your face with heart-pounding low-frequency oscillations and interdimensional guitar squeals. We look forward to seeing you very soon.”

He is absolutely not lying.  The Beasts here suggest that you get your first, second and third helpings of this freak stew before both members get busy with any other mega projects they might also be involved in. The last lyrics in this song are; “you ought to try it you really ought to try it” and we can assure you we agree. Try the song and make sure to catch them in July at Bonnaroo!

 

Soundwave is Facebook for Music Lovers
July 17, 2015 11:00 am

Soundwave is a social media app that allows users to connect their phone’s personal music library, as well as online accounts like Spotify and Pandora, to their Soundwave account and share what they’ve been listening to. The user can look up and add friends from Facebook and Twitter to find out what they’ve been listening to as well. 

The format of the app is also similar to Facebook. Users can view a feed of what their “friends” have been listening to, and are able to hear a clip of the song posted. The app also supports video playback from YouTube. A “Groups” feature allows users to form chatrooms where they can share songs privately, and create playlists together.

soundmap

Launched in 2013, the app is available in 14 languages and has been downloaded by 1.4 million users in over 194 countries. As a result, the most interesting feature offered is “Music Map”, a map of the world where users can zoom in on any country or city and see what songs are popular there. A cursory search of the New York City area reveals popular choices in music to be Muse, The Prodigy, and Meek Mill. In Sydney, Australia it’s Meg Mac, Gotye, and Diplo.

While sharing the music you love is great, there is some concern about the app merging into TMI territory. We’re all guilty of the occasional Taylor Swift binge, and it’s not something our friends need to know about. There is an option in the settings to hide songs for 60 minutes, but for any real auditory privacy, it looks like users need to log out of the app completely. Not ideal, but having the option is valuable. 

Soundwave was recognized in the “Best of 2013” collection in the Apple App Store. On the Android platform, Soundwave was featured in the “Staff Picks” section of the Google Play store in 2014, where it also won Editor’s Choice.

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