new

KEEP YOUR INTAGRAM PHOTOS WITH CHATBOOKS
September 2, 2016 10:50 am

A taste of nostalgia seems to be something that everyone loves. It is why we spend so much money on instant cameras, typewriters and record players. We all love the feel and the look of the analog, there is just something about the digital that loses the panache of things. This is exactly what Chatbooks is about.

Chatbooks tries to capture the magic of the photo album, in an era where the concept seems archaic. The way they revitalize this idea is in an ingenious manner. Chatbooks uses its app to link up with your Instagram or your Facebook account. After it is linked up, it gives you the option to scroll through your photos and find the ones that you want to add to your photo book.

The service is a simple one but it is one that has real potential. Many of us feel that even though our photos are up on a social media platform, that there is something about them that is just not as special. It might be that they are not physically there, not tangible objects that we can see with our eyes and touch.

When the inevitable zombie/ecorp/mayan/skynet apocalypse happens and the machines attack, you’ll be happy to know that you can still look at those memories of you, your friends and family. The product is one that will attract people of all ages, it provides you with a great idea for a gift, for anyone and at $8 per album, why wouldn’t you?

THE END OF GAWKER MEDIA
August 18, 2016 10:57 pm

 

Here’s an article by Mary Elizabeth Williams, candidly discussing her brief stint as a Gawker punching bag, all while not only battling cancer, but also grieving the loss of two family members. Her tone throughout just screams “I EXPECT BETTER,” questioning the validity of the site’s mastered craft of insulting someone in a public sphere, no matter the circumstances. In response to Williams’s piece, the pop culture dungeon of snark gave a rather long-winded, unsolicited lesson on the importance of criticism that basically boiled down to this: suck it up. Such was the Gawker way.

Watching its existence dangle in uncertainty – courtesy of a self-proclaimed racist, washed-up, wrestler’s lawsuit, secretly bankrolled by Grudge Holding Billionaire Peter Thiel – ‘The Gawker Way’ is what made rooting for the media outlet very difficult for many. Both sides were terrible, but one less than the other. Here’s a hint: any side not getting secretly bankrolled by Grudge Holding Billionaire Peter Thiel is usually going to be the lesser of two evils. The fact that someone rich enough had the ability to wipe an entire publication off the face of the internet because of something written about him, no matter how tasteless, sets a worrisome president. Oops, I mean precedent.

This is the ideology baggage that comes with defending Gawker in this particular instance. So when news broke this Thursday afternoon that Gawker will be ending operations next week after being acquired by Univision, it lead to a healthy mix of sympathy and celebration.

For years, each site spawned by Gawker Media has made a name for itself by being hyper-critical, unforgiving, and often times crude. As evinced by the cringeworthy headline to this Deadspin article featuring a pair of racial slurs, and Jezebel’s Sony-hack-exploiting discovery of Amy Pascal’s recent Amazon purchases, they flaunt this reputation proudly.

So what should be made of a media company that treated their subjects in such a way? Readers and writers alike would frequently waffle on their stance, almost daily, based on whether or not Gawker’s vitriol was being used for good.

MEME-TRUMP

Make no mistake, there was plenty of great writing all across the board. Just a couple of months ago, there was a hilariously thorough investigation on the possible origins of Donald Trump’s infamous hairstyle done by Ashley Feinberg. Gawker also proved to be a launching pad for many important conversations. Although comedian Hannibal Buress sparked the nationwide exhuming of Bill Cosby’s unchecked half-century of shittiness, Gawker also helped with this article written by Tom Socca months before Buress riffed about it on stage. In addition to Kotaku’s consistently strong defense against the endless black hole of gross that is Gamer Gate, Jezebel always provided some of the funniest, hardest-hitting satire online.

Gawker’s sophomoric recklessness, however, can’t be legitimized by claiming that the good outweighs the bad. Gawker always gave a maximal effort when it came to making a point or looking for dirt on pop culture figures. Sometimes it was done by hijacking an ad campaign with Hitler quotes. And other times writers would just blindly throw a dart at a wall of actors’ headshots and whichever beau it landed on, they would insist that he’s gay.

Outrage from these pieces would come and go like the ocean tide. Disgruntled readers eventually moved onto something else, and everyone on team Gawker reveled in all the clicks their outlandish behavior garnered. It seemed as though this would be the perpetual give and take. Little did anyone know, Grudge Holding Billionaire Peter Thiel was biding his time for nearly a decade, looking for a way to finally put an end to this problematic smut-haven.

To be completely fair to Grudge Holding Billionaire Peter Thiel, Gawker outing him was despicable. Reluctant apologists have been sharing the article on Twitter recently, saying that for Gawker standards, it was tame. That same argument was used by Williams’s friends as a way to console her after getting Gawker’d. And admittedly, yes, for Gawker standards the Thiel article actually was tame, oddly complimentary too. But the fact that one of the site’s more tender examples of writing still involves outing a gay man has to be challenging for any Freedom of Press defender to stomach.

It would not be surprising if a fresh batch of Gawker imposters sprout up in the next few years looking to make a name for themselves. Nobody should, though. It was a bold experiment, being terrible to everyone on the planet, but media outlets shouldn’t start priding themselves on being devoid of tact and empathy. Leave that to all the off the wall celebrities out there.

MESSAGE SAFELY WITH SESAME
August 3, 2016 9:48 am

In a post by Edward Snowden, privacy can mean the world to some people. I don’t know about you, but between the regular run of the mill paranoia and the media hyped overplayed Orwellian way in which the government seems to have control over our information, I am honestly a bit scared.

A bit. Not too much. That’s probably because things are so bad that I might’ve just gotten used to it.

Regardless, privacy is a big concern to a lot of people nowadays. It is something that companies try their hardest to maintain. The Apple vs. FBI case earlier this year goes to show the extent to which a company will stand their ground in order to keep some sense of reliability with their customers. If privacy is your worry, check out Sesame.

Sesame is an encrypted messaging app. While Messenger from apple is very good as is, it is not enough sometimes. The paranoid tin hat wearing version of me never thinks general encryption is enough. I have to stop watching Mr. Robot.

Sesame works just as you would think, they promote your right to “own all of your data and messages.” The app is great, you can customize little things, you can change who can and cannot save your messages, it has end to end security encryption so that both users are protected, a feature that Facebook JUST added that we talked about earlier this week.

It also has one of the best features that I have ever seen on any app, ever. The “unsend” button. No matter how far back you send a message, you can unsend it. Fantastic isn’t it? It’s everyone’s dream button. How many times have you sent something and you wish you hadn’t. Let Sesame make that dream a reality, and in doing so, save you from getting in a lot of trouble.

The app is only available for from the App Store for now, but if you are lucky enough to have an iPhone, make sure to keep your information protected from the government fat cats and the oligarchs trying to destroy our society. As of the time of this post, it has been taken down an you can sign up to be put on a wait list for it here.

AUSTRIA LOVES LEYYA
June 20, 2016 11:48 am

Quick: how many bands can you name from Austria? None? I’m disappointed in you. You can make it up to me by checking out Vienna-based electronic band Leyya. Their 2015 debut, Spanish Disco was recently reissued with some new remixes for their fans in the US and UK, with the song “I’m Not There” to be featured on the MTV show Scream.

ATYPICAL SOUNDS spoke with vocalist Sophie Lindinger about what’s to come, festival life, and the best new bands in Vienna.

Congratulations on the release of your debut album, Spanish Disco! Is there anything you’d like people to know before they listen to it?
If it is your very first listen: take your time, sit down, let the music do it’s work. To really get into it – absorb it!

Did you do anything to celebrate its release?

On release day, we were playing a show in Brighton at The Great Escape Festival and learned that “Butter” went Number 1 on our favourite radio station. But else, not really. Marco and I are not the kind of people who “rest on our laurels“. If we had not have set a final date, we probably would still work on it. We are very happy with the result and after a time of consideration and the realisation that it is finally out, we wouldn’t change anything after all. Meanwhile we have already started to write new material – that’s the best way to celebrate!

Did you help with the concept for your “Butter” video?

We always start with a certain idea we have for the song we want to make a video to. But in the end, the people we work with, like Gabriel Hyden or Martina Trepczyk, convert our ideas to an actual viable concept. We might change a few scenes or involve in the editing a little bit, but basically we just let it happen.

Your Facebook page says “Leyya” means “marketing strategy” in the Alaskan Yupik language. How did you figure that out?

Well, to be honest…Leyya is a not a real Inuit word. It doesn’t mean anything. We just thought, if someone actually Googles the term to get proof, it has already got stuck in his head and we love the irony about that. The name Leyya is simple, short and you remember it.

Do you prefer performing at large festivals, or in smaller (more intimate) clubs?

I can’t really decide what I like best. Small club shows mostly are something special, because the people actually come to see you and somehow absorb everything you do and play. On the other hand, festival shows give you the opportunity to catch a new audience and a larger target group. Everything is already set up, you mostly have a huge backstage and you don’t have to think about anything.

So I think if time, surroundings, mood, people and many different factors play together – it doesn’t matter where you play. It’s all about giving the audience a good time and to have a good time playing.

Are there any bands you were/are really excited to perform with at a festival?

It is always exciting to perform in a festival where someone is playing that you like. Most of the time you don’t actually meet them, but to see your band name on the same poster as the name of one of your favourite bands, makes you feel a little proud.

I was really looking forward to seeing and meeting at a German festival in June, but then I saw the timetable and realized that we’re playing on a different day…so… damn it.

What is the music scene like in Vienna?

The music scene in Vienna is growing exponentially – and luckily it is getting more and more international attention. Plus there is also much more attention for this scene in Austria itself, which is something considerably new, too.

What are your favorite places there to see live music?

We do now have festivals in Austria where only Austrian bands are playing and people love it! But also the small locations, especially in Vienna, are pretty charming, too. B72, Chelsea, Rhiz, Fluc, WUK…the list goes on and on.

Are there any artists in Vienna you feel deserve more attention?

There are a lot of bands who deserve more attention, and I do not know where to begin – Hearts Hearts, for example, whose debut album was one of my favourites last year. Schmieds Puls, Ant Antic, Avec, Monophobe, Mynth, Robb…be sure to get yourself a little more into that. Austria has a lot of hidden treasures.

What are your plans for the rest of 2016?

In summer we’re continuing to tour and going to play festivals around Europe and we’ll use the time we have left to write new music. I think it reduces your creativity when you are always worried about what to do next, so we don’t really plan much further into the future. Many things just happen and might open up opportunities you don’t expect at all.

SERF-ING WITH JONS
June 6, 2016 11:57 am

When there’s a will, there’s a way. Jons is celebrating the May 29th release of their debut album Serfs of Today. It was recorded on iPhone, and led to the band’s signing with Solitaire Recordings. The album was so good, that Solitaire decided to release it as-is.

The Victoria (Canada, not Australia) band is also about to embark on 29-date tour, including a show supporting fellow Canadian Alex Calder. And, believe it or not, Jons is already working on a follow-up album.

ATYPICAL SOUNDS spoke with frontman Patrick Rendell on how all of this craziness came to be.

jons

Congratulations on your new album and your signing to Solitaire. What would you like people to know about your band?

We’ve all been living on Vancouver Island for 5 or 6 years. The band started out with Logan, David, and me making music casually and then the band was fully formed when Logan and Keenan met painting houses.

I’ve heard your album Serfs of Today was recorded on iPhone and cassette. Is that true?

Yeah, that is partly true. There was a period where we didn’t really have the means to record drums (and didn’t really know how to either) and so David would play drums on an app on his iPhone directly into the tape machine. For “Orcachief” I played floor tom and snare while David played ride symbol on his iPhone to get the effect of a full kit.

You’re getting ready for a 29-date tour around Canada. Is this your first tour of that size?

It’s been a lot of work setting up the tour and it makes it harder that we haven’t actually done this before. The longest tour we’ve done so far is to Calgary and back so this is a completely different ballgame.

What are your favorite items to pick up at Tim Horton’s to keep you going?

One good way to prepare is to abstain from Hortons’ until you leave so you have a fresh palette. Keenan’s favourite donut is the Old Fashioned.

You will also be performing a show with Alex Calder on your tour. How did you get involved with him?

Bands in Canada are very interconnected and chances are you always know someone who knows someone. In this case our friends Freak Heat Waves were already playing the show and we were going to be in Montreal at the same time. Logan’s brother also plays in Alex’s band so it just worked out.

You seem like a band that would know a lot about psychedelic music. Are there any albums you’d recommend to someone looking to expand their record collection?

Some albums we’d recommend checking out are A Lovely Sight by Pisces, God Bless Tiny Tim by Tiny Tim, Playback by The Appletree Theatre, July’s self titled album and Release of an Oath by Electric Prunes. Also [Pink Floyd album] The Piper at the Gates of Dawn and Friends by The Beach Boys are staples.

Are you working on a followup for Serfs of Today?

We’ve actually been working on our followup to Serfs of Today for coming up on two years now. Dave picked up a Tascam 388 and has become really good with it so it’s a noticeable step up in fidelity. Having Keenan play on the record has been a big deal too. He didn’t play on Serfs of Today and he’s an incredible musician. His playing on the tracks has had a huge effect on our recordings. We’ve been working on it for a very long time and we’ve each grown quite a bit individually as musicians in the process.

Will you be be doing any recording with iPhones, as in Serfs of Today?

No iPhones were used in the making of the record.

I think you’re the first band I’ve interviewed from Victoria. What’s the music scene like there?

It’s really great. It’s a small city but for the size there’s tons of really great bands. Sometimes people pass it by on tour because they don’t want to make the trip to the island but there’s some very cool stuff going on here. I’d highly recommend coming here and checking it out if you get the chance.

Which venues in Victoria are your favorite for seeing live music?

Some of the classic spots to see bands play are Logan’s and the Copper Owl. There’s also a bunch of nightclubs and a thriving scene of DIY spots that are really great to play at.

Are there any local bands you feel deserve more attention?

Some bands you should check out are Privacy, Pinner, Smoke Eaters, Psychosomatic Itch and Fountain. There’s also a small local tape label called Gary Cassettes and everything they’ve put out has been really sweet.

What will you be up to after your tour?

After tour we’re gonna focus on new music. After working on the same songs for so long we’re really stoked to get started on something new.

Will you be performing at any music festivals?

We’re playing at Sled Island in Calgary but thats our only festival this summer.

HELLO, SUMMER FLAKE
May 2, 2016 1:31 pm

It can be easy to forget about all of the great music coming out of Australia, what with it being on the other side of the world and all. But we all have the internet now, and it would really be worth your while to spend some time exploring what our Aussie friends have to offer.

Summer Flake is a three piece band, and also the pseudonym of Stephanie Crase, a musician from Melbourne by way of Adelaide. Songs from their new release Hello Friends have been described as “A hypnotic guitar riff and a steady drum beat [which] create a sound that could lull you to a trance.” (Stereogum).

ATYPICAL SOUNDS had a nice chat with Stephanie on the pleasures of recording at home and the story behind the cover of Summer Flake’s latest album.

summer_flake_2

I’m sorry if you’ve been asked this before, but where did the name Summer Flake come from? It makes me think of that chocolate bar Cadbury makes.

Haha, that’s nice! Yeah, I originally liked all the beachy connotations, I thought it lightened me up, but now I kind of resent that the word “summer” is stamped on everything, that can really change the vibe of a song. Back in 2007 it was my pseudonym in the band Birth Glow; I was Summer Flake, Nick Walton was Dried Up Leaf, and Ellen Carey, Raven Blue Winter. No spring. The whole Summer Flake project was almost called Pinched Sphinx – I thought that was a cool gag; a bunch of awkward consonant sounds back to back, impossible to convey to someone first go…I’m really glad I didn’t stick with that.

Are you still recording your music at home? What is that process like, versus working in a more “professional” studio?

Home recording is a great way to work out what you like and don’t wanna sound like. You know recording is easy – phones, GarageBand, 4 track cassette recorders are everywhere, all you need is time and a little obsession and you’ll spend evenings on Gumtree and eBay for parts, trying to achieve some unnamed idea you have only in your head that can keep you occupied for days, years.

I think recording is a skill like playing an instrument – you practice, you try new toys, new equipment, new mics, new software, and you make the limitations your strengths. I used a Motu 4pre external sound card plugged into a desktop PC that my brother built, a really dated cracked copy of Adobe Audition, and just played with different mics, pedals, plugins, and made myself comfortable in private and just doing a little bit every day and in no time you’ve got hours of music to edit, and that’s easier than a blank canvas. That was the luxury of living in Adelaide though I guess, less work, more time, cheaper space.

When I moved to Melbourne I lost my spare room and my patience and I felt like shaking it up, giving up some control, enjoying the collaboration. I mean, I gave Geoff O’Connor a hard time I’m sure, but he did a great job. He’s also a self-taught recording type, but nerdier and fancier than me, dreamier microphones. Lately I’ve been writing differently – blank canvas style, acoustic demos, rough and direct to my phone.

Was there anything you learned while recording Hello Friends that you wish you had known going into the process?

Yeah, I shoulda learned not to stress. I always spend so long on the lyrics, but I don’t really change much. Maybe it needs that reflection time anyway. Maybe I’ve learned nothing!

Is there anything you’d like people to know before listening to Hello Friends?

It’s not meant to be easy.

The album cover for Hello Friends is a painting of you putting lipstick on your face. How did that come about? Is it a comment on feminism or consumerism?

You know, I was messing around with a friend for a photo shoot, and I have always been uncomfortable with what is the norm; expectations of aesthetics and behavior of femininity in the world. The never-ending demands, judgements and contradictions – to fit in, be made up, look natural, be innocent, be sexual, be fashion as expression, shun fashion as a facade. Lipstick is this dense signifier and I love it but I feel uncomfortable in it, but I desired it, and it felt like a thousand uncomfortable rejections and embraces at once, to use that blood red gloss as a mask to cover me, and to reveal me as a weirdo, a woman, scared and scary, solitary in the mirror reflected, looking at myself, but also facing the world. I thought that would look cool as an album cover.

You were in a number of other bands before forming Summer Flake. What kind of experience do you feel those other bands gave you?

Creative outlet, camaraderie, confidence, joy, friendship, focus. It was life-changing discovering that other people wanted to do this kind of thing as much as I secretly did. Band practice was the highlight of my week, it was my passion. I never thought I’d ever play solo back then though. It was about the group collaboration, and I enjoyed not being the main decision maker. I think I’m easier to be in a band when I’m supporting, not leading.

Are there any musicians in Melbourne or your hometown of Adelaide you feel deserve more attention?

Yeah lots! Lots of stuff that’s different or difficult or rough around the edges, things that are too loud or too quiet, that’s the good stuff. Sarah Mary Chadwick has just recorded a new album which is devastating and hits the right melodic melancholic notes, that’ll be out later this year. Wireheads from Adelaide are powering on, recording album after album in a short number of years, and they’re back in the US recording again in May. Esther Edquist from Superstar has a new solo thing called Sweet Whirl and is recording an album. She plays bass and croons like someone who likes Neil Young, country, and trip hop. That sounds terrifying, but it’s really cool.

What are your favorite venues in Melbourne or Adelaide for listening to music?

I like small venues. I’m not leaping across stage or putting on a lighting show. If there’s anyone watching, listening, I need to feel like we’re close, in the same space. I like Ancient World, Format and the Metro in Adelaide, and the Tote, LongPlay has a tiny seated cinema which can be cool for gigs, the Old Bar, Dane Certificate’s Magic Shop in Melbourne.

What are your plans for the rest of 2016?

We’re touring Australia in May and I am dying to go to the US – anyone need a tour buddy? Email me your tips please, I’m scrambling for cash, and aiming for later this year. I’ve been to the US twice doing band stuff and it was heaps of fun. Real friendly types.

Any takers?

DEEP SEA DIVER SHARES THEIR SECRETS
April 12, 2016 1:13 pm

Though the band Deep Sea Diver has only been around for a few years, writer and multi-instrumentalist Jessica Dobson has been on the scene for much longer. Signed to Atlantic Records at 19, Dobson recorded two albums that were ultimately shelved before moving on to collaborating with bands including The Shins, Beck, and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.

Older and wiser, Dobson then went on to form Deep Sea Diver, with this past February seeing the release of their second LP, Secrets.

ATYPICAL SOUNDS had the privilege of speaking with Dobson to get her take on the new album, touring, and life as a seasoned musician.

timewilltell2

Photo by Brian S. Snider

Congratulations on your album release! Are there any new songs that you’re especially fond of playing live?

JD: Thank you! I really love playing “Wide Awake,” “Notice Me” and “Body on the Tracks” because I get to really step out on guitar on those ones and I think the fans really love that. There a lot of sweet guitar solos and pedals to play around with. It makes it even more exciting for me to do something different every night, especially with “Wide Awake.”

When you tour, how do you prepare to hit the road? What do you do to pass the time while traveling?

We basically start rehearsing about a month ahead and try to get the songs so deeply ingrained in our muscle memory so that by the time we hit the road, we feel totally free playing the songs. Its all about energy and vibe for us at shows, so we want to be emotionally as present as possible, not worried about whether or not we are ready to play the songs. In the van, its easy to tune out and go on your phone for hours on end, I try to read a few books at a time, and keep a journal about whatever I’m experiencing on the road and at shows.

Do you have any places you look forward to visiting when you tour?

New York is always a highlight for us. There’s a distinct energy in the city and we always see it as an adventure when we get to bounce around the different boroughs and eat the best food and stay out way too late.

Seattle might still be best known as the birthplace of the grunge movement. Has any of that culture remained popular in Seattle? Has it come back since the resurgence in popularity of 90s music?

Thankfully grunge has not made another comeback yet, but I think that music business people in Seattle wish that there was another resurgence of a scene that popular (insert $ signs). The music scene in Seattle is thankfully much more broad now and hopefully it will continue on that trajectory.

You’ve been a part of the music industry for about 10 years. What advice can you give to someone looking to break into the field? What do you think the biggest misconception about the industry is?

Music business is basically 99% smoke and mirrors and if you elevate the business end above the creative end, you will most likely be sorely disappointed. There is absolutely zero stability in the music industry and sometimes good art gets noticed, sometimes it doesn’t. You have to do everything you can to keep creating from an honest place and make the best art you possibly can. That is much more fulfilling than trying to pander to music business people and to fleeting musical trends.

What’s it like working with your spouse? Is it difficult to leave the workday behind once you get home?

Yeah its almost impossible to stop our minds from thinking about new songs, record label plans (we started a record label, High Beam Records) and what the next step is for Deep Sea Diver. We fight about silly things like who’s chorus ideas are better, but when we aren’t being immature, it’s the most fun to create with the person you love most.

Are you working on anything with The Shins at the moment?

Nope! I had to give Deep Sea Diver my full attention in order to get this new record out and to promote it as much as possible. I believe they are working on some new songs and I can’t wait to hear what comes of it!

You’ve also worked with Beck. Do you feel more pressure to perform well when you’re working on your own projects, or other people’s?

Performing live is one of my favorite aspects about being a musician and I treat any project or show like its the last thing I’ll ever do. I love the kind of healthy “pressure” that comes with performing, and it causes me to keep pushing my limits live. With that said, if a show of Deep Sea Diver’s gets a bad review or goes poorly, yeah, it stings a bit more because we wrote these songs and they are much more personal to us.

Is there anything you’d like your fans to know before listening to your new album?

If you can tell me who I’m singing about in the song “Secrets” I’ll somehow find a million dollars to give you.

WILDCAT! WILDCAT! HEAD STRAIGHT TO THE TOP
March 25, 2016 10:35 am

Wildcat! Wildcat! are back with their newest jam “Straight To The Top“.  Those familiar with Jesse Taylor and Jesse Carmichael’s signature mix of dueling falsetto melodies and tightly packed layers of synth and percussion are in for a treat. The duo’s wide vocal range and colossal sound is befitting of a song that dabbles with themes of perseverance and determination. We at ATYPICALSOUNDS agree: you’ve got to be a beast to get to the top.

Wildcat! Wildcat! emerged in 2012 with a string of infectious singles. 2013 saw the release of their self-titled EP via Downtown Records, and included the sensational tune “Mr. Quiche“, the accompanying video to which features a guy break-dancing in a cat costume. What more could you ask for, really? Wildcat! Wildcat! released their debut full-length No Moon At all in 2014 followed by an extensive world tour. One can only imagine how exhausted they were after that marathon of events, so it’s perfectly justifiable we haven’t heard from them in a minute.

Unfortunately, Wildcat! Wildcat! doesn’t seem to have any live gigs lined up at the moment, which means you wont be seeing them at any music fests this summer.  Worry not though.  Keep an eye out for new singles, as word on the streets is they have been busy in the studio piecing together new material, meaning there’s more on the way soon.  In the meantime, their entire catalog is available via their SoundCloud.  Check out the new single in all of it’s glory below.

SXSW SPOTLIGHT ON: NEW MYTHS
March 16, 2016 11:51 am

“We are an all-girl electronic power trio”

Occasionally it’s just easier to let a band introduce themselves.  Drummer, percussionist, and backing vocalist Rosie Slater couldn’t have summed it up better in an article featured in Modern Drummer Magazine.

Post-Punk revivalists New Myths follow a deep tradition of New York underground rockers that have payed sonic homage to their music idols while offering their own sleek iteration. You can make easy comparison’s to the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, who introduced a new indie-obsessed generation to the icy shriek of Siouxsie Sioux, or Interpol’s metro-polished take on Joy Division’s Ian Curtis.  New Myths’ guitarist and lead-singer Brit Boras summons the haunting vocal muse of Blondie, but injects it with grungy guitar-pop more akin to Paramore.

 

??CMJ day 4! Today were playing @ @rockwoodmusichall @ noon & @thedelancey [downstairs] @ 2:15pm! thanks again to @melismaticdiva for the GIF! @pancakesandwhiskey @atypicalsounds #cmj2015 #cmjmusicmarathon #cmjmusicfestival #newmyths #melismaticblog #thedelanceynyc #rockwoodmusichall #nyc

Posted by New Myths on Friday, October 16, 2015

New Myths quickly gained traction in 2013 after an endorsement by the late Lou Reed. The legendary Velvet Underground singer-songwriter/noise-rock-pioneer hand-picked “False Gold” off of New Myths self-titled debut EP and showcased the track on XM Radio syndicated “Lou Reed’s New York Shuffle”.  When New Myths convened a year later to record their full-length Give Me Noise, they were fortunate to collaborate with veteran producer Seth Glassman, who’s worked side by side with Paul McCartney, James Brown, Elvis Costello, and many others. You can check out the bulk of New Myths music on their SoundCloud.

We’re excited to announce that New Myths will be performing at our very own ATYPICALSOUNDS SXSW Day Party this Friday, March 18th, at Darwin’s Pub. We’ll see you there!

THE GLORY OF GOOD MORNING
November 29, 2015 11:28 pm

Melbourne band Good Morning has returned to Australia after 11 performances at their first CMJ and positive reviews from publications including Spin and NME. ATYPICAL SOUNDS had the pleasure of welcoming them to New York during that time, and you can read our interview with them here.

Now, the band is settling back in at home, and getting ready to release their Glory EP in February 2016. We were given a sneak preview of the album, and will do our best to convey its sound to you. It’ll be like you’re right here with us.

The album opens with “Overslept”, a lo-fi track that makes you feel like a pack of crayons on a hot radiator. Singer Stefan Blair certainly sounds sleepy in his delivery of the lyrics, “I overslept today/ What in the world/ What in the world/ What in the world should I say?” It’s the type of song that makes you want to stay in bed a little while longer while listening.

The EP gives the impression of following Blair and bandmate Liam Parsons through a lazy day during a hot, Australian summer. The timing of the release will be great for the band’s fans at home, since February falls during summertime in the southern hemisphere. For the rest of their fans, who will inevitably be freezing their asses off during this time, the album sounds like a chilled-out vacation in a much warmer climate.

“Cab Deg” is the band’s first single to be released from the EP. It’s the most “indie” album on the track, featuring extended vocal harmonies and a poppier sound. However, Blair and Parsons quickly bring the listener back down to reality during “To Be Won”. Played predominantly on acoustic guitar, it can be a challenge to decipher Blair’s softly-sung vocals, leaving the track up to interpretation over whether the song is sad or tastefully subdued. Either way it’s beautiful, making “To Be Won” the second single due to be released from the EP.

Between the first 3 and last 3 songs, the sound changes, like the guys have had some coffee. Overall, there’s less distortion and these tracks sound cleaner and more produced than the previous ones; “Give Me Something To Do” features some fancy saxophone but maintains the vocal harmonies of “Cab Deg”. However, the track goes in a new direction with spoken lyrics towards the end of the song that sound like they could be the slightest bit influenced by Lou Reed’s Street Hassle.

“The Great Start”, the penultimate track, carries through the psychedelic feel of the EP, but adds an airier, more atmospheric sound that blends well with Blair’s sleepy vocal style. By the time “In The Way” begins to play, I can’t imagine the listener is anything but blissed out, and this track prolongs that feeling all the way to the end of the EP. “I’m so sorry/ I get caught up…” is repeated through the track, but it’s never quite clear what Blair and Parsons are apologizing for. It doesn’t matter; it’s another beautiful song on the EP. Finally, it dissolves into a swirling puddle of sound before picking up and giving us one more “I’m so sorry…” and gently letting us go.