sxsw2016

LOVE YOUR BOYFRIEND
April 1, 2016 10:47 am

Boyfriend is hard to miss. She’s the one wearing vintage lingerie, her hair in rollers, and depending who you ask, may have started a cupcake fight during this year’s SXSW. You may have caught her last year when she toured with Big Freedia, or learned about her three EPs, LoveYour Boyfriend, parts 1, 2, and 3. The performer from New Orleans is also a brilliant conversationalist, a connoisseur of diners. 

We met up with Boyfriend at Hey Cupcake! in Austin to enjoy some beautiful weather and even-more-beautiful cupcakes.

It’s been raining here, and the mud is full of clay.

BF: You can eat it if you’re starving. It has minerals. My grandmother grew up in the 1930s in rural Alabama, and she was telling me how when they were out working sometimes, they would scoop up a little clay and be like “om nom nom.” That is so Alabama.

I think they used to eat sparrows during the depression, as well.

BF: Oh dear. That’s disgusting to me. Those disgusting, starving people.

They probably don’t have a lot of meat on them either. They’re so small and have all those feathers.

BF: They barely have marrow in their hollow bones. I’m vegetarian so I’m a little out of my realm, so who knows.

I was raised vegetarian – my parents are hippies.boyfriend_2

BF: Did you revert?

I eat fish.

BF: I eat fish occasionally. If it’s a nice sushi place.

Is there good sushi in New Orleans?

BF: I love oysters. Raw gulf oysters. Sorry Pacific and any other place that has oysters, I’m all about the gulf oysters; I mean they’re the biggest and the most delicious. But I’m biased because I grew up on the gulf coast.

How is it in New Orleans since the hurricane?

BF: It’s thriving and vibrant and expanding and gentrifying, and all of the -ing words that you associate with a hip place. Much like Austin, or Nashville, or Asheville, or Brooklyn, just a neighborhood that you used to not go to, you now go to. I think that New Orleans, specifically, is back with a vengeance. There’s just so much going on there right now.

Do you feel like you have everything you need to run your career from where you are in New Orleans?

BF: I sort of resist the narrative of being a “blank-based artist” because I think anyone who’s being realistic knows that you’re an internet-based artist, and that physically you might be in one place but your emailing with people in different places every single day, and you’re going to places for meetings, and for sessions. So, could I have stayed in New Orleans and not leave, and become who I’ve become? No way. But I don’t think anyone could stay where they live and become who they’re going to become. You should always reach out. I’ve always been very much a tumbleweed, gypsy lady.

Have you lived in other places?

BF: I grew up in Nashville, I lived in LA for five years, then I lived in New Orleans. But during all of that, I’m also traveling constantly, bouncing around the country. It’s the nature of the life.

What are your favorite places to listen to music?

BF: I used to really enjoy Cheer Up Charlies, but I don’t know if I’m going to be allowed to go there anymore. Even back when it was called De Ville, it was a great space. I think our days are numbered.

What happened?

BF: I performed there the Friday of SXSW, and I brought cupcakes from Hey Cupcake! Before a show, I want a hot bath and I want a cupcake, and having been to Austin several times before, I was familiar with Hey Cupcake! and how delicious their stuff is, especially their cream cheese icing.

The person I shared my Lyft car with this morning said the same thing.

BF: So I’m not alone. So I was having one, and I said to the manager, “We need to make sure that everyone at the show tonight has one of these. I think that would be very special”. I was the final set of the night, so everyone was going to be hungry and drunk. We’ve got to feed them. So we brought 250 cupcakes to the show to make sure everyone there got to have one, and things got a little bit rowdy as they tend to at the end of a show. And, unfortunately, the venue was kind of upset about that.

Did you have to stay behind and mop the floor?

BF: Well, I didn’t.

Was this your first SXSW?

BF: My second, technically my third. I was there, sort of as a ghost my first year. As a spirit, haunting the place.

Did you perform?

BF: I did, unofficially. I enjoy.

Your costumes are great [she’s wearing a 1950s-style satin bra and panty set with a dressing gown].

BF: Thanks. Believe it or not, this was from a fan. I perform a birthday bash every year in New Orleans and it’s become sort of a thing where I give everyone gifts. I pretty much give everyone gifts at every show; cupcakes, tampons, something, but since it was my birthday I decided to really go all-out. So anyone who came in lingerie received an actual present in a bag. And that’s something I do for all my birthday shows – you dress up in lingerie, you will be rewarded.

Well, I started receiving gifts as part of the whole exchange and someone handed me this beautifully wrapped, it was wrapped in an antique mat with a sprig of lavender, and [gestures to her dressing gown] this robe was inside of it. She just took it upon herself to make this for me. So then I reached out to her on Instagram, my favorite place, and said “I love the robe, I want something to wear under it.” and so she found this vintage pattern, and I sent her my measurements, and I picked out the color, and it matches my nails. And there we are.

It looks great.

BF: Thank you! It feels great. I’ll never wear another thread of denim in my life. I need something slick.

Denim can chafe, especially if it’s hot out. When I was researching you for this interview, I noticed that certain publications were trying to describe your performance style. I think NPR called you a “mysterious, raunchy, feminist”, and Paper Magazine said you were “endearingly weird.” Do you feel like those descriptions are accurate? Or rather how would you like people to see what you’re doing, and what would you like them to get out of it?

BF: I practice bathtub meditation, and one of the things I focus on when I am neck deep in bubbles, is not being invested in the reaction of others, for I know I have no control over that. I can control whether or not my nails match my outfit, I can control how much champagne in pour into my flute before I get into the bathtub, but I cannot control how people react to me. So they will choose their adjectives and I’d say that NPR chose some pretty good adjectives. I hope other people agree with those adjectives. I’m sure there’s a few flying around after Cheer Up Charlies. I love the English language, whether the adjectives are favorable or unfavorable.

A lot of your songs focus around feminist issues. Would you say you became interested in that because they’re issues that effect you directly, or are you interested in feminism as a whole, or is it a combination of the two?

BF: Feminism as a whole, and feminism as an individual, and feminism as an unconscious mode of being. As being a woman, born into the world, and walking around the planet as a woman. These are just the things that I experience and encounter, and those are the things I comment on.

Have you performed in New York?

BF: I have. I was on tour with Big Freedia this fall, and we performed at Irving Plaza. And I’ve performed at Pianos, and I’ve performed at Joe’s Pub. I especially love Joe’s Pub because the cabaret setting is the perfect setting for Rap Cabaret.

What’s coming up for you this year?

BF: I released an album yesterday. It’s a baby, an infant, it has not yet suckled at my teat, it’s so young. So that was Love Your Boyfriend, Pt. 3. and it is the third and final part of the Love Your Boyfriend EP.

Do you listen to a lot of rap?

BF: I’ll tell you this: I don’t think that Harper Lee read a novel and turned around and wrote To Kill a Mockingbird. I think that she grew up in the south, as a woman, experiencing things, observing things, and then she wrote To Kill a Mockingbird. And that would be my answer to who influences me, and why I avoid talking about music that I listen to. Because I think that journalism, the knee-jerk reaction is to be referential, saying “If you’re this band, you must like this band, this band, this band.” And the band says “Yes, we do like this band, this band, this band.” It just becomes a list instead of a dialogue. Waiting in line at the bank might be as influential on a song as a concert you saw when you were four years old.

I did actually go to the Lilith Fair when I was eight. My mom loved Sarah McLachlan, but when I was eight, I was loving Jewel. Pieces of You is like my jam. Yeah, I loved the Lilith Fair.

Do you have any last words before you hit the road again?

BF: Let them eat cake.

BASSH INTO SXSW
March 31, 2016 9:30 am

Though the name Bassh may be new to you, it’s members shouldn’t be; the band is comprised of CJ Hardee and Jimmy Brown of Matrimony. Though they have only released one single so far, Bassh has already managed to catch some buzz from sites like NPR and Perez Hilton.

We caught up with CJ and Jimmy in Austin to talk shop about SXSW and what it’s like being a new band working towards their own sound.

How did SXSW go for you guys?

CH: It was exhausting, but fun.

You did four shows?

CH: We had four shows, plus a couple of other things, we were running around nonstop, basically.

JB: We had a lot of fun, though. It was really awesome.

What sort of things did you do for fun?

CH: We went to a castle. We finished a show and met a photographer, and she invited us to this castle. It was literally a castle.

Was it nearby?

CH: It’s in Austin, somewhere. There was a pool-moat, it was literally a castle. I’m talking spiral staircases, the whole nine yards. And they had a full bar, they had a bass rig, a guitar rig. We just hung out and played as a band all night. So that’s what we did for fun.

How did your shows go?

JB: They were really good. There were lots of different venues, we really had a good time. We saw some new bands, and we were all just kind of exploring and figuring out how to do live shows in the best way. All of us have been in different bands before, so I really value that opportunity to acknowledge the fact that [Bassh] is a new thing and it’s raw and we’re still figuring it out. I think for me, to put it in layman’s terms, when something is happening to you it’s a lot more exciting but a lot of the time you don’t realize it in the moment. And then you look back and think, “That was a really good time.” We try to keep up with how fresh it is, and really enjoy it, not put too many expectations on it, and just let it happen.

Was there anything you learned in your past bands, that you carried over to Bassh?

JB: You learn a lot of stuff along the way. You learn how to play better, you learn how to sing better, how to deal with things going on better, how to cope with being really tired better.

How do you cope with that?

JB: You just have to get over it. Sarah, our PR girl, she brings us water and stuff to rehydrate us.

Have you been to Austin before?

JB: I’d been there a few times to play shows with other bands, Austin’s a great place.

Do you have any pointers for bands going to their first SXSW?

JB: Don’t expect to get a soundcheck. For someone that’s never done SXSW before, they might freak out that they might not get that. You get there, you have five seconds to set up, and they feel like “This is South By, I thought I was going to make it this year.” You never know who you’re going to meet, or who you’re going to see. You just got to kill it.

You’re based in Nashville now, right?

JB: I’ve been there 10 months or a year, something like that.

How do you like it so far?

JB: Well I’m still there. It’s one of those things where you move somewhere and you learn a lot because your environment changes. You get to enjoy the new things, and also the pros and cons. I think for Bassh and for the music side of things, I think Nashville is a good place.

Are there certain things in Nashville you feel you can benefit from, versus being based in a place like New York or Los Angeles?

JB: Probably, it depends on what your goals are. If you want to write with other people, and perform with other people, than those are all good places. Some people don’t want to do that, a lot of people realize that’s not for them and they just don’t want to do that. It just depends. It’s a good experience and it’s good to feel it out, and you’ll definitely learn something from it.

You released “Body”, your first single, recently. Is there an album coming?

JB: We’re going to do another single pretty soon, and we’ll put out an EP or an album. We’ve got a plan. Once you put an album out, it’s out, so it’s like the way the music industry is, everything is very instantaneous. So once you make an album, then you have to make another album. I think for us, we’re a band still defining what our sound is. I think doing it this way allows us to be more creative.

EVERYTHING IS NICE WITH LUCAS DIPASQUALE
March 30, 2016 10:02 am

What do Canadian 20-somethings have in common with Jamaican dancehall music? Everything, apparently. Lucas DiPasquale went viral in 2014 with his acoustic mashup of Popcaan tracks and just recently he was at SXSW, performing with bands including The Posterz and The Lytics.

We caught up with Lucas in the lobby of absurdly luxurious Austin hotel The Driskill to get his side of the story.

lucas

Was this your first SXSW?

LD: Yes, it was incredible. I didn’t know what to expect. I’d never been to Austin, never been to Texas. Honestly, other than Miami, I’ve never been to the southern United States. I’ve never really explored down here, and it’s just a different United States – different than the big metropolises like New York and Chicago, way different. I love that.

I got there on Tuesday. I had some good meals and did a few shows on Tuesday and Wednesday, and saw some great acts.

Did you see any bands that you thought were really good?

LD: I saw Anderson .Paak, Jake Bugg, both of them just incredible. Blew my mind. I saw Jack Garratt at a Playstation kind of event, he was…as a person who uses loops onstage, I have an acoustic guitar, and I try to do my own one-man kind of thing? He blew my mind. Just incredible.

You’ve been playing guitar since you were eight-years-old. What inspires an eight-year-old to pick up a guitar?

LD: I actually asked for drums. I always had rhythm, but my parents were like “Ehh…I don’t think so, let’s get you a guitar.”. So it kind of just happened, and then I didn’t really start playing until I was 14 or 15 years old, and then I just started singing all the indie and alternative music I was listening to, and some of the rap music, trying to play it on the guitar.

And then you had that viral video.

LD: I kind of just played whatever I wanted on guitar through high school, and then in my first year in university, at the end of it, I made a Popcaan cover and it did well. It started my career.

Did the idea for your video initially come as a joke that turned into a realization that you were actually really good?

LD: I didn’t take it as a joke, but I saw it as just a cover. I listen to that music, I wanted to show my buddies that, and I was just like “Yeah, this is cool.” It’s like singing anything else. And it did well, it got a lot of attention, a lot of people respected me for that more than they respected me for anything else. I like all music, so I was just happy that people dug it. I was flattered by it; dancehall people, Jamaican people, people who are invested in the culture really liked it.

You look at artists like Iggy Azalea, who are doing something in the same kind of vein as you, and they’ve had these intense knee-jerk reactions from the public. Was that something you were concerned about?

LD: It’s still something I’m concerned about. Cultural appropriation is a discussion, it’s a conversation that needs to be had, and it’s a real thing. When you’re not real about it, or you’re doing it for the wrong reasons, then people should be upset with you. But I covered the song because I love rap and dancehall music. So music that’s not necessarily made by, you know, my race…hip hop is born in New York, so it’s “not supposed to happen”, but through the internet and by other means of communication, the music got to me. And I love it. So I just sing whatever I sing.

Are there other artists in Toronto that you feel deserve more recognition?

LD: There’s a guy named John River who’s just an incredible rapper. I’m not sure how much you know about Toronto, but there’s a greater Toronto area; so he’s from Mississauga, I’m from a place called Markham, which is just 45 minutes outside Toronto. And I don’t know him or anything, and I just started listening to his music, but I think he’s gonna bust.

You were in college when you released your video. Did you leave school to pursue your career?

LD: Yeah, so after I made the video I got a few emails from music people and record labels, asking if I was serious about it, and I don’t really know if I was, but I took a few meetings. And then my manager now, I signed to him a year and a half ago, to his production company, and it kind of just started it.

Was it a hard decision to leave school?

LD: I really liked school. I was at Ryerson for radio and television arts, and I loved it. I still love it, I still go back and make videos and stuff. But I was also waiting to do this for a while, and I think I can do this well, and I really want to perform for everyone. It was hard in the sense of “Do I want to stop going to school?” But it was easy in the “Yes, I’d like to make music. Yes, I’d like the opportunity.”

Are you considering moving to a place like New York or Los Angeles to pursue your career, or do you think you have everything you need in Toronto?

LD: Currently? Absolutely, I think I have everything I need. The future changes, and you never really know what’s going to happen, but I love Toronto and as long as I have what I need, I’d stay there forever.

What are your favorite places in Toronto to listen to music?

LD: I listen to a lot of rap music, I listen to a lot of indie and alternative music, but it’s still established artists; they’re always playing at the ticketed places like Sound Academy. My aunt sings at this jazz bar called The Rex, and I just went there the other day and I love being there.

You just released your first EP in October.

LD: There are four songs with a live version of one of them, so five tracks. That was crazy for me. It felt like my career was leading up to that, and it happened, and I was like, “Wow.”

Do you have a song from there you enjoy performing the most?

LD: I think “Come Home” is a lot of fun to play when I’m not in Toronto, because it’s about going home to Toronto and I really feel it when I’m playing it.

I’m going to be releasing a new album, probably this summer, and there’s a song called “Pager” that I’m going to start working on. It’s about my family, and I always play it in my sets. Every time I’m singing about my grandpa, and my mom and dad, I really feel it. So that’s probably my favorite song.

Do you find you’re often inspired by your family?

LD: I’m close with my family. They’re so supportive, and they’re different. I’ve been exploring the world and meeting new people, and you meet such lovely people most of the time, and you meet some people who just aren’t like your family. You realize you have really good parents and I have two brothers, they’re twins, and they’re all really good people. So you realize how blessed you are when you start exploring people and realizing what you had and what other people had and it’s cool.

STILL CORNERS LIVES
February 1, 2016 12:10 am

When a band goes more than two years without releasing anything, their fans begin to worry. Or worse, forget. That’s why it was something of a Christmas miracle when Still Corners released the single “Horses at Night” at the end of 2015. It was their first release since their 2013 LP Strange Pleasures and well worth the wait. I’m pleased to announce that Still Corners is very much alive.

To commemorate the occasion, ATYPICAL SOUNDS had a nice chat with writer/producer Greg Hughes and vocalist Tessa Murray.

You released a new single, “Horses at Night”, at the beginning of December. Is this in anticipation of a new album?

TM: We wanted to put something out before 2015 ended, we had just finished that song and thought yeah, let’s put this out. It’s not on our next record and was just a one-off really.

Will there be a tour in 2016? Any U.S. dates? How about SXSW?

TM: Yes we’re planning some SXSW shows and a new tour as we speak.

You toured with Chvrches in 2013. Are there any experiences on that tour that stood out to you?

GH: There were tons of people at the shows, lots of great cities. I remember driving through New Mexico, just seeing this massive expansive flat desert with mini-tornadoes everywhere, appearing then disappearing as we drove. We spent a lot of time in our van. Nothing like waking up on your friend’s armpit, just in time for sound-check. I just remember having my imagination rejuvenated more than anything else.

Tessa, you sang in choirs before moving to singing with Still Corners. What was it like to make that jump? Was there anything that surprised you about singing with a band?

TM: To suddenly be standing in front of a huge drum kit and guitar amps and synthesizers took some getting used to. I didn’t really have any idea what it would be like, but we hit our groove. The feeling you get after a performance is similar though, it’s a big high when you come off stage and know that the audience was into it.

What are your favorite venues in London? Are there any parties or club nights you’d recommend?

GH: Bush Hall is great. For larger shows the Barbican and Shepherd’s Bush. Any night at Cafe Oto.

Greg, what advice can you give for someone in the U.S. who is looking to move to London? What was it like for you when you first moved there? Scary? Fun?

GH: When I first arrived my mind was blown; I needed a new mind after that. My advice is to do it all. Ask around for a cheap room, rent is high. Bask in the glory that is the National Health Service and never worry again about convoluted over-priced healthcare. Drink pints often. Get rid of your car, you won’t need it.

Are there any foods from your native Texas that you wish they had in London? What have been your favorite foods in the U.K.?

GH: Proper Mexican food, but there isn’t proper Indian food in Austin. You can’t win.

Be on the Lookout for Still Corners in 2016.

ATYPICAL SOUNDS WINTER PLAYLIST
December 5, 2015 1:04 am

I love when the seasons change. Mostly because I love runny noses, flu shots, sweaty pits in the afternoon and frozen fingers at night, and the overwhelming desire to be in bed at 7 because it really feels like midnight. Well, the Winter season is slowly pulling into the station, and before we know it, it’ll officially be time to curl up by a fire (or Widow Jane) and listen to our freshly made, gluten free, hand picked winter playlist! Curated by us BEASTS for your ears and this special time of year. Happy Holidays and winter season from your Atypical family.

1.Nico- Winter Song

2.Golden Panda – Snow and Taxis (Throwing Snow Remix)

3.Twin Shadow Castles In The Snow

4.The Chemical Brothers -Wide Open

5. Little Wings -By Now

6.Adueduct-The Ballad of Barbarella

7. Jack Garratt -Breathe Life

8.MYZICA – I Was Made For Loving You (KISS cover)

9. Mumford and Sons – Winter Winds

10. City and Colour -Northern Wind

11. Elvis Depressedly -Weird Honey

12. Salvia Palth – I Was All Over Her

13. Hippo Campus -Violet

14. Brothertiger – This Must Be The Place (Naive Melody)

15.Caveboy – In The Grottos

16. Legs – Whole Wide Woman

17. Rubblebucket -On The Ground (homemade acoustic version)

18.Khamari – Love Yourself (Justin Bieber cover)

19. Fleet Foxes -White Winter Hymnal

20Bob Dylan -Girl From The North Country

21. City Of The Sun -What Took You So Long

22. ODESZA – Light ( feat. Little Dragon)

23. Little May – Hide

24. Dean Martin -A Marshmallow World

25. PWR BTTM – Carbs

26. Beta Radio – On The Frame

27. Vancouver Sleep Clinic -Vapour

28. Harrison Storm – The Words You Say

29. Bear’s Den -Elysium

30. Dustin Tebbutt – The Breach