tour

TWIN ATLANTIC TAKES EUROPE
October 17, 2016 9:00 am

Twin Atlantic seem to be celebrating the release of their album GLA by tearing Europe to shreds. After a summer spent playing festivals including Glastonbury, Reading and Leeds, and T in the Park, the band is taking the show on the road with dates in Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, and a whole ton of other places.

ATYPICAL SOUNDS exchanged some transatlantic emails with drummer Craig Kneale and got the scoop on the creation of GLA, and the finer points of living in Glasgow.

I was in Glasgow over the summer, and did a number of things that are probably considered “touristy”. What do you think visitors to Glasgow generally miss?
Glasgow has a thriving arts scene, and I suppose you would miss that if you didn’t dig a little deeper below the surface. The four compass points of the city (East/West/South/North) are all so different from each other too – you won’t get the full picture unless you experience a little bit of each of them.

King Tut’s is a pretty well-known music venue in Glasgow. What others do you like for seeing live music?
Well, not being biased – but Barrowlands is one of the greatest venues in the world. I’ve never seen a bad show there – there’s something in that room that creates an electric atmosphere between the performer and the crowd that’s really special.

You’ve performed at a number of music festivals, as well as some smaller venues. Do you prefer one over the other?
I think you can’t really appreciate one without the other. I suppose that our own shows are always more special to us – but it’s great getting to spend the summer playing festivals when the pressure is off a little. When it’s your own show and people have paid to see you, there’s more at stake as you don’t want to let people down.

Are there any bands/musicians in Glasgow you feel deserve more attention?
I’m a little out of the loop on music in Glasgow at the moment, but I really like Holy Esque. I think they’re already on their way up, but even the biggest bands in the world could do with more attention I guess.

GLA, your new album, has a much heavier sound than your previous releases. Did something make you want to create a less pop-sounding album?
It kind of naturally happened when the album was being written. Perhaps subconsciously the songs turn out heavier as there were moments on the last album where we weren’t all fully attached to the songs. GLA seemed to be much easier to record than the previous album – so perhaps it’s a more natural sound for us.

What music are you listening to currently?
I’m currently listening to a lot of Parquet Courts + Mac DeMarco. And I got the new Local Natives album this week which I really like.

You recorded GLA in Los Angeles, which is obviously very different from Glasgow. Is there anything you miss from your time there that you can’t do at home?
Well, the sun is out constantly so you don’t have to plan to do things dependent on weather like you do in Glasgow. Being able to drive to a beach and look at the ocean is something I don’t think I would get bored of either.

What advice would you give a band who are just entering the music business?
Just throw everything at it and always go with your instinct.

Is there anything you were surprised by when Twin Atlantic was first starting out?
Hmmm, not really. Everything at the start of this band was a learning curve for the 4 of us so we kind of tackled everything together. We started right at the very bottom so we were kind of prepared for most steps by the time we got to them.

Are you planning any shows in New York?
I really hope so. It’s one of our favorite cities, and one we’d love to come to more. I think there are plans to get over early next year, so hopefully it all works out.

EX REYES: GREAT TIMING
October 3, 2016 10:24 am

You’re probably familiar with Ex Reyes and don’t even realize it. Known to friends as Mikey Hart, the accomplished musician has worked with artists including Mitchell Yoshida of Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros and Albert Hammond Jr., and has just began a tour with How To Dress Well where he will be producing 18 shows of the tour as well as performing with his own band. Jeez, Mikey. You’re making the rest of us look bad.

ATYPICAL SOUNDS caught Mikey just before he left on tour and had a nice chat about his debut album as Ex Reyes, Mardi Gras, and the practice of “Mitchelling”.

You’re getting ready to put out your first solo release. Was there anything you learned during its production?
I think my favorite records are just a reflection of a moment, like a photograph, so I tend to kind of fall in love with recordings all along the way. Some of the songs on the upcoming EP have parts that were recorded like 5 years ago, forgotten, and then rediscovered.

So producing, playing, writing music, is just a constantly moving process and I like just being along for the ride and trying to be available whenever something inspiring happens, cause you definitely can’t force that…you can count on it happening, but you have to catch it. I’ve been producing music with and for friends’ projects before this so from like, a technical perspective, I know how to operate the machinery.

You also collaborated on a number of songs with Mitchell Yoshida of Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros. What would you say he brought to those songs and the overall creative process?
Mitchell is an incredible musician and a wildly creative person—when he lived in NYC and was playing around on the scene, we’d use a term called “Mitchelling” which was basically accepting that he’s going to come in and completely improvise over the music, no fixed parts, but it’s gonna be amazing.

We started some of this music years ago with some other friends, with the idea to form a band. But everyone was too good at what they do and got busy so it turned from a band to like, recording session collaborations when we could get that to happen. Usually, Mitchell would roll through and I’d open up a session and we’d just identify one thing to work on and carve out, and then set to it…so like, I spent a while with Mitchell playing with sounds and tracks and ideas before I ever really figured out how I wanted to sing over it or write over it.

How much input did you have in the creation of your video for “Bad Timing”?
Haha, damn—I pretty much did that from top to bottom, with the help of friends in Nola who are super sick at what they do. I treat Mardi Gras as my one like “holy holiday” that I ask off for, but last year I waited too long to get the tickets so I had to stay for a pretty long time on either side of Mardi Gras day to not spend a fortune.

So I was like, I really want to make a video with that extra time. The initial idea was to go out to a place called the Almonaster dump, which is a massive dump area in New Orleans East that we used to pass going to our grandma’s house, and just blow up a trashed car to kind of exhibit like, you can still do something crazy like that in New Orleans. And then I wanted to mix that idea with an impression of detachment, which is where the parade stuff came in. Like what if you present Mardi Gras festivities as sort of an inevitable background to whatever foreground experience is much bigger? I was thinking of a way to kind of express my bewilderment or exasperation with social inequality, inevitable racism, sexism, homophobia…I can’t tell if the past couple years have been particularly insane, or if me/society is just becoming more aware of the insanity in marginalized communities, the under-publicized social strata.

But anyway, I drove around for a couple of weeks trying to find a car to blow up and the marching band you see in the video is the incredible Edna Karr Marching Band. My friend Akasha Rabut, a brilliant photographer from New Orleans, has been doing a photo project with Edna Karr so they were kind enough to invite us to shoot at their school and on their buses as they prepared for the NOMTOC parade (which is the one you see in the video).

Is your upcoming tour with How To Dress Well your most extensive tour yet?
Without a doubt. It’s also particularly nuts for me cause I’m leading my band and I’m also leading How to Dress Well. So there’s just a massive to do list and I try and chip away at the old ice sculpture a little bit every day until I get a beautiful, life size, frozen sculpture of a successful tour!

Real talk, I’m super excited. Ex Reyes has only played small shows in New York in kind of DIY spaces so it will be an insane and lovely experience to play these rooms and play for Tom’s incredible audience.

Is this arrangement allowing you to do anything you’ve wanted to do, but haven’t had the resources to do until this point?
Maybe this is the same answer as above…I think the main thing is it’s allowing Ex Reyes to get in front of people in all these cities and show them what we’re about, which is such a fucking cool opportunity for a new band.

Also everyone in Ex Reyes live band is like next level talented so I can’t wait to take that level of musicianship to these stages and show off how awesome the band is!

What have you learned from performing with more established musicians like Albert Hammond Jr. and The Cranberries?
There’s literally so much I’ve learned from them, and more yet to learn. I always joke with Albert that he taught me to rock again cause I spent so many years kind of playing background music or indie rock, you get into this performance style of like “oh, sorry we’re here playing live music”. Maybe part of me still feels that way, but Albert showed me the value of a good fucking guitar stance and how to own a guitar solo like it’ll never go out of style.

Playing with bands, I feel like musicians playing instruments may go in and out of style or feasibility based on demand, but it will always communicate to people in a space when there’s risk involved. Like, you’re up there performing because there’s a risk that it could all go to complete shit and you’re supposed to be good at keeping it from going to shit. I learn something from the people I’m on tour with whatever size, really. Cause you become sort of a momentary family unit, and it doesn’t take long before you’re really just willing to talk about whatever.

Your Facebook page lists your location as “New York City/New Orleans/there too”. Have you lived many places?
It’s more like, I’ve spent long stretches of time not really living in a place. I’ve been touring for so many years now, I never really get used to staying put. Kinda makes me nervous after 2-3 days of being back. Before touring I was traveling around playing music on the street. But my stuff and my psyche always orbit around New Orleans or New York. I’ve only really taken up residence in those two places, and Accra, Ghana.

New York has so many great venues. Do you have a favorite?
I think my favorite venue will always be Zebulon, RIP, because of the fearless booking and laid back vibe. That vibe is hard to find nowadays.

Also Bowery/Music Hall cause the sound is always so incredible and the staff is rad. Shout out to Winston, the security guard who works the backstage stairwell! Dude is rad. We talked about Isaac Hayes for a while once and now it’s just what we talk about when I see him. Just like “Hey! Hot buttered soul! Alright man, peace!”

Do you have any fond memories of Webster Hall, where you’ll be playing with How To Dress Well?
I think this is a funny question because I remember the days of “amateur strip night” at Webster Hall. I lived in the neighborhood then—I never went—but the scene outside on the street was always pretty unhinged.

But, yes. I’ve played Webster a few times and it’s always felt like a milestone—I’ve been playing music in NYC a little while now so each time you go a rung up on the venue capacity, it feels exciting…I remember playing a sold out show with Bleachers at Webster just months after playing to 10 people there with my friend’s band, I remember playing there with Albert in the Marlin Room cause it was our first show as a band and it was insane to book a New York show as your first.

But more than those I think I really have a fond memory of riding my bike back from the beach in 2005 and going straight to a Lightning Bolt/Boredoms with 3 drummers show and just being super sun burned, sandy, and stoned and wiling out so very hard. Stuff like that used to happen more often, damn.

What’s your favorite place in New York to get pizza?
The nearest place. Unless I’m trying to show off, then it’s DiFara’s forever always.

Check out tour dates here, and there are a lot of stops! Find one near you and see what makes them so amazing.

TWO DOOR CINEMA CLUB IS THE SHAMROCK MUSIC KING
September 29, 2016 5:27 pm

Two Door Cinema Club are an Irish indie rock trio that seemingly just want to dance. Alex Trimble, Sam Halliday, and Kevin Baird make music that instantly plug ear-worms to your cerebellum with instant infection. Their music videos are also as infectious, showcasing the band’s quirky, yet honest, sense of humor. Forming in 2007, while the lads were still in school, they have since released two full-length albums, with one on the way in October, and a handful of EP’s. They have gained a substantial following in their home country of Ireland, and are doing the same in the US with incessant touring and festival appearances.

Prior to forming Two Door Cinema Club, the trio performed as a band in their teenage years dubbed “Life Without Rory”. The band, released 3 demos,  finished dead last in local competitions, and decided to move on to greener pastures. The trio came back together to form another band without a full-time drummer and settled on the name Two Door Cinema Club after Sam Halliday’s mispronunciation of the local movie theater the Tudor Cinema.

Two Door Cinema Club released an EP in 2009 titled Four Words to Stand On that gained a little interest. Their first full-length record, Tourist History, was released in 2010 with the band finding their niche. Tourist History went on to be selected for the Choice Music Prize for Irish Album of the Year. Follow-up album Beacon was released 3 years later to similar reaction pushing the band to release a four-part tour documentary entitled What We See. An EP, Changing of the Seasons, came in 2013 coupled with a jump to Parlophone Records in 2015. Their third proper album, Gameshowand first for Parlophone, is slated for release in October, 2016.

Two Door Cinema Club will be featured at the Austin City Limits Festival on October 1st, and will continue touring North America through November 2016.

SPRING KING REIGNS SUPREME
August 26, 2016 10:44 am

 

We  should all be paying more attention to what goes on in Manchester. I know I’ve been guilty of ignoring that city to the north of London, but we’re all missing out because that’s where Spring King is from. The band released their debut album Tell Me If You Like To in June, and it’s been getting quite a bit of airplay. If you’re in the UK, you can catch them on tour this fall. In addition to sounding totally ass-kicking, their drummer is also their lead singer. That alone is worth the price of admission.

ATYPICAL SOUNDS got to trade some quality emails with Tarek Musa, Pete Darlington, and James Green, and find out how they’re preparing to tour, and what’s good in Manchester.

I’ve been to London but never Manchester. Do you think people are missing out on anything by not visiting?

James: I think Manchester has a great atmosphere around it, the people are much more welcoming on the whole and there’s a lot of amazing culture that you wouldn’t necessarily find in London, from the Northern Quarter bars and restaurants to places like the Whitworth Art Gallery and areas a bit further afield like Chorlton and Didsbury. It does rain a lot more though…

What are your favorite venues in Manchester for seeing live music?

James: The Deaf Institute has always held a soft spot for me since I worked there, otherwise Soup Kitchen hosts some of the best small shows and club nights in the city and The Castle is an incredible pub and amazing venue for more DIY acts. I’ve seen some awe-inspiring shows at The Roadhouse, but it shut down recently which was devastating.

Are there any good record stores over there?

Pete: Piccadilly Records is my favorite record shop in Manchester. I grew up in a town outside of the city called Macclesfield. Almost every weekend I would go into town and pick up a CD from Piccadilly. So many of the records I bought there changed my life! They have a really varied selection, from underground US releases to Tropicalia to the latest pop stuff. You have to go there if you visit the city.

James: There’s also an amazing dance music specialist called Eastern Bloc – the guys in there are all top level DJs and really know their stuff, and are always more than happy to help you out with recommendations!

Is there anything you learned while recording Tell Me If You Like To that you wish you had known prior to recording?

James: I think we had a pretty good idea of what we wanted to achieve before we went into the studio, although we’d probably like to plan a little bit more before we start on the next record – we wrote quite a lot as we were going along when recording TMIYLT, and it’d be nice to start with a few more songs fully fleshed out next time around.

Your Facebook page says you don’t have a record label. I’m a little surprised, since the band seems to be doing so well. Is there a reason you’re not signed?

Pete: Hah that’s not true! We’re signed to Island in the UK and Terrible in the States. I’ll fix that…

Tarek, you’re the drummer and also the lead singer. I feel like it would be more difficult to drum and sing at the same time than it would be to sing and play a different instrument (like guitar). Is that true?

Tarek: I only started singing and drumming at the same time when we started this band. It was definitely a real challenge at first. Now it’s become second nature though, so I’m not sure!

You have a fairly extensive tour coming up in the autumn. Do you need to prepare mentally for something like that?

Pete: Touring can be tough mentally as well as physically. When I’m not on the road I try and eat as much home cooked food as possible, sleep in late, meditate and read. It’s important to start the tour feeling as rested as you can. Besides that, we tend to do a few serious days of rehearsal just before the tour starts to make sure we’re feeling confident about the set.

What do you do to kill time on the road?

Pete: I play a lot of video games and try to read as much as I can. Passing time isn’t too hard when you’re on the road with your friends. There’s always something to argue about and discuss.

I see you’re performing at Thekla in Bristol. Are you fans of Sarah Records? The label’s last show was at that venue.

James: Honestly I’ve never heard of them, but I’m just flicking through some of their back catalog whilst typing this and absolutely loving it! Thekla is one of our favorite venues, we played there with a friend’s band called Spector and also recently at Dot to Dot Festival and it was INCREDIBLE – horridly sweaty and just perfect!

Will you be coming to New York any time soon?

Pete: No plans at the moment, but I’d love to go back. We played CMJ a couple of years ago and that was a lot of fun.

James: CMJ and SXSW last year were two incredible experiences for us, both personally and as a band, so we’re praying we’ll have the chance to come back!

ROBBERIES: BAND THEFT AUTO
August 25, 2016 9:22 am

 

With the internet allowing music to be at our finger tips without having to pay for it, many bands tour around the country in packed vans as their only way to make real money. Touring is fun. Going to places you’ve never seen, playing your music to screaming fans every night seems like the dream right? Bands take all their gear, clothes, computers and money and lock it in their vans, thinking it’ll be safe while they go play a show for their fans. By end of the night they come outside and expect to get in their cars and go to the next city. This is when they realize that they’ve been robbed. Everything is gone, from passports and cash to computers and irreplaceable items. This is when touring can go from a dream to a nightmare.

Small independent bands seem to be the biggest target for these types of robberies. Most of these bands reluctantly set up Gofundme pages (an online website where people can donate to a cause) and make posts looking for their stolen gear asking others to keep an eye out for the gear in pawn shops or craigslist.

While fans rally around the bands and support them the best they can, unfortunately most of these cases go unsolved.

Despite all of the difficulties they’ve faced, the outpouring of support can give some bands an optimistic outlook on the situation, while others don’t have the same outlook. Hip-Hop artist Spose, who was robbed in St. Louis, vowed that he would never go back to the city after having his computer and musical equipment stolen. “I had a lot of worked saved to my computer, and some personal things, including pictures of my family,” the rapper said. He wrote on his Facebook page; “I’m done with St Louis, if you want to see me perform in the future come to Chicago or something because St Louis is dead to me.”

It’s hard to imagine having your livelihood stolen right out from underneath you WHILE you are either on your way to the job, or inside DOING the job. For some, it can be devastating, as they may never get back personal items, like a first guitar or computer full of demo tracks. If you see something, speak up, and ALWAYS do what you can to support artists who put their entire lives on the line  to bring music to you. The least you can do is buy some merch!

TROYE SIVANAUSTRALIA’S EMERGING PRINCE OF POP
August 2, 2016 4:34 pm

“I’m addicted to working. For me to be up all night writing songs and waking up early and posting teasers—it’s addictive to me. It’s just my natural state to be creative, even on my off days.” –Troye Sivan

The hard working Australian musician/Youtuber/actor Troye Sivan sounds like he could be an ATYPICAL SOUNDS staff member, but unfortunately he’s probably a little busy between touring, writing music and being the 3rd most subscribed to Youtuber in Australia.

Sivan says that it’s “not his job,” to disprove the stigma Youtubers might get, but when he makes such good music, why should he have to?

I care about my music, what people think of me. I just want people to hear my music with an open mind. If you don’t enjoy it, that’s cool. But don’t not listen because of that label. It’s going to take a few years before people take it seriously, but it’ll happen. –Troye Sivan

Sivan is on his way to becoming a bonafide pop star, 4,260,226 subscribers can’t be wrong. His debut Blue Neighborhood is airy, yet aching. His songwriting is innocent, smooth and brutally honest. Blue Neighborhood is such a perfect title, it’s filled with good vibes and yet there’s an underlying tinge of pain reminiscent of a midnight drive.

Not many artists can live up to the hype of 4 million people, but Troye Sivan does.

A NIGHT OF CHOCOLATE AND CHEVAL
July 28, 2016 6:50 pm

When walking into any small time club, you can expect some loud popular music while waiting for a band to go up on stage to have fun and play some cool tunes. But last night at U Street Music Hall in Washington DC, a small club turned into a musical hot box.

20427_620380401430800_4122135562059143816_nStarting the night with some cool DJ work from local artist Dirty Chocolate, he pumped out some of his own music while playing club hits with elegantly twisted remixes. From metropolitan city Gaithersburg, Maryland, he taught himself how to make music while going deep into the internet. From humble beginnings (graduating the same high school that I did) to sick clubs, Emmanuel Osemene has a strong future ahead of him. I had a minute to chat with him about his experiences with music after the show:

I’ve always been a huge fan of music…I love discovering music and finding people who push boundaries. It’s cool to see talented people use their imagination to make music better. You wouldn’t hear it in my music but Pharrel, Timberland, Daft Punk, Juicy J, Kanye West, Justice, Radiohead, Pink Floyd, and Tame Impala have been some of my biggest influences.

After him, the crowd turned around to the main stage and there were so many switchboards and keyboards that I honestly had no idea what to expect. Then the band started to play and I was immediately blown away as the four of them played musical hacky sack, taking turns on solos and bits of the song while perfectly supporting each other.

Their name is Club Cheval, they live in Paris, France are in the states for a bit to tour. Theyed play song after song of fantastic electronic sound and mixing with a superb drummer in the back who ended the show with the gnarliest drum bit I had ever heard. I had a chance to talk to Panteros666 (the drummer) right after their set list.

Tell us about yourselves…

We live in Paris, but we we are from a little city called Lille…We have a lot of influences there from Britian and Belgium so we have that kind of culture where we just mix everything together.

Where do you get you unique sound from?

Literally everywhere. We don’t put any genres on any pedestal and have no hierarchy with our music. We listen to stuff like Hip-Hop, Balie Funk from Brazil, Slow Jam and experimental stuff. I’m into trance and lots of other stuff. Each one of us has our own certain sound and we like to mix it to create something different. It doesn’t really work well in France though, so that’s why we’re here, we can relate better with the people. Sometime we are just too powerful for them and that’s probably why we are bigger here.

How did you guys meet?

To cut a long story short, we were all doing our high level studies which actually including political sciences, sound engineering and other areas. But we got together in our small city and were really obsessed with making a new breed of electronic music. We did well in our little city and then moved to Paris and met a lot of people and now were here playing music.

It was amazing how humble and relaxed Dirty Chocolate and Club Cheval were. It was a fantastic show, great start and great end with happily ringing ears all the way home. Check out more Dirty Chocolate here and Club Cheval’s tour dates here and new album here.

DIVE INTO DIIV THIS SUMMER
July 14, 2016 11:12 am

diivAfter three and a half years of silence since the release of their first album Oshin, DIIV finally returned this February with Is The Is Are and stayed true to their shoe-gazey vibes. They’ve already toured around Europe earlier this year, now bringing their new tunes to fans all over the U.S. this summer. So what took them this long to get their new music out?

It’s really hard to write and record a double record when you’re playing all over the world and you’re getting on flights and driving around or whatever -says Zach, vocalist/guitarist of the band.

It’s a lot of work. They work you hard nowadays. You have to tour. That’s what you have to do. (Under The Radar)

Though this New York native band is pretty young in age (they formed in 2011), they’ve been through a hell of a ride through their musical and personal journeys. Remember when Zach Cole and Sky Ferreira were “arrested driving to a DIIV show in Cole’s unlicensed van, where they are found with heroin and ecstasy”? (NME). In addition to that, he cancelled his European tour and ditched his manager. People were starting to see DIIV as a bunch of guys who lived a ‘Rock n Roll lifestyle’ that spent a little too much time on drugs to make music and did whatever they want. Despite all the negative attention they got, they picked back up and continued to write their music as a band. But honestly, who cares if they’ve fucked up in the past when they came back with such a solid album?

It’s hard to know, sometimes, what draws people to the band. When people come up to me after the show and talk to me about the music itself, it makes me really happy because I’m like, “You’re not here for some weird reason. You’re here ’cause you listen to the music and you appreciate it and like it.” That’s what it’s all about for me, just the music. (Austin Chronicle)

The one thing this band does best is that no matter where you hear them – a record in your room, a small 100 person venue in Brooklyn, or an arena – they’ll always sound like DIIV.

The music’s designed so that we can play in a basement and sound great or play in a fucking arena and sound great. Like, we could go up onstage at a U2 show, punch the Edge in the face, steal his guitar and play on all the band’s gear, and we would still sound like DIIV. (Rolling Stone)

So go do yourself a favor and pick up their latest album Oshin to upgrade this summer with some beachy indie-rock tunes.

HINDS IS THE NEW STANDARD FOR INDIE ROCK
July 13, 2016 3:35 pm

Wow! Just, wow. HINDS is everything an indie rock band could ever dream to be. This indie rock band from Madrid is so powerfully raw that you’ll think they are the ones who created rock music.

Starting in 2011 as a duo doing primarily covers, Carlotta Cosials and Ana García Perrote built a small following with their strong vocals and guitars skills. After recruiting Ade Martin on bass and Amber Grimbergen on drums, the duo became an epic foursome of spirit and attitude for the indie rock scene.

Their first album, Leave Me Alone, came out January of this year full of smashing hits. There is something impressively simple and thoroughly amazing about this these four girls. I realized it sounds like they are the first people to ever pick up guitars and drums and sing at the same time. I mean this in the best way possible, as if they are the first ones to discover what rock music could be. Their style is all from them, no outside influences or pressures from the world, you hear these artists pour every ounce of their soul into every track. The guitars meld together on every song and their layering vocals are so sweet and driven by emotion, it’s addicting. I hope you can hear it the same way I do, and the more you listen, the more you see their raw talent and personality in every note.

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Their new music video for “Warts” is a punch in the face message about loving the wrong person and watching a train wreck of a relationship. The description in the video says, “have you ever seen a couple that shouldn’t be a couple? Have you ever seen your friend’s girlfriend’s warts before he does?…..She is gonna beat him bad, but he only hears parabarabaraba.” It has everything a indie rock band should have: style, originality and a sound that stay with you all day.

Enjoy this wonderfully bittersweet music video and check out the rest of the album Leave Me Alone, with songs like Bamboo, Warts, San Diego and Garden, you’ll never want to listen to anything else this summer.

I SEE STARS: TREE HOUSES
July 1, 2016 11:31 am

Metalcore, electronicore and post-hardcore had a baby. Its name is I See Stars and was born in 2005. Michigan natives Devin Oliver (vocalist), Brent Allen (guitarist), Andrew Oliver (vocalist), Jeffrey Valentine (bass guitarist) and Dakota Sammons (drums) all comprise the electronicore band and have been blazing the trail for this genre.

In 2006, they released their E.P Green Light Go before signing with Sumerian Records in 2008. They made the Billboard 200 list with their first full length album 3- D in 2009 in collaboration with producers Paul Wisner and Cameron Mizzell. Two years later they released The End of the World Party, thus beginning the integration of electronic music into their screamo-esque music.

They went mainstream after appearing on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”, being featured on Substream Magazine and Alternative Press and touring with Black Veil Brides. A year later in 2012, they released Digital Renegade with the addition of Danny Worshop (Asking Alexandria) and Cassadee Pope (ex-Hey Monday). New Demons, released in 2013, incorporated more electronic and trap elements and made it to number 28 on the Billboard 200. In 2015 they released a pair of remix albums reinterpreting past albums and reimagined favorites as acoustic/orchestral songs with a combination of covers of Daughter, Disclosure and Hozier. Some bands have that special drive, passion and charisma, I See Stars is one of them.

TreeHouse is their newest album just released on June 17th. If you have’t got a listen in yet, click here! In addition to their new release, I See Stars is on the roster for Warper Tour 2016. Click here to find tour dates near you!